Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

Results 1 - 20 of 97 next >

Todd Rundgren and Donald Fagen Take on Donald Trump in Video for 'Tin Foil Hat'

The video for Todd Rundgren's "Tin Foil Hat" takes the form of a news broadcast by "Bill O'Rangutan." Continue reading…

Bruce Springsteen surprises audience at Van Zandt concert

Bruce Springsteen has surprised concert-goers in New Jersey with a performance during the encore of a Steven Van Zandt show.

Count Basie Theatre executive Jon Vena said Monday the crowd "erupted" when Van Zandt introduced Springsteen during the Saturday show as "a friend who's out of work."

Springsteen emerged on stage during the encore and played four songs, including "Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out" and a cover of Marvin Gaye's "Can I Get a Witness."

Van Zandt and the Disciples of Soul were playing at the theater in Red Bank to mark the release of Van Zandt's album "SOULFIRE."

Van Zandt is a member of Springsteen's E Street Band.

It's not the first time the New Jersey native Springsteen has surprised audiences. In April, he played a two-hour jam session at the Asbury Park Music & Film Festival.

Standing Rock film festival centers around pipeline protest

A film festival on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation aims to bolster the anti-pipeline movement that blossomed there last year while also fostering connections between the Native American community and the film industry.

The inaugural Standing Rock Nation Film and Music Festival, which runs this coming Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the tribal casino near Fort Yates, will showcase the talent of Native American filmmakers and musicians. It also features films about American Indians and provides a venue for those who opposed the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline to reminisce.

"It was the most amazing coming together of people from all over the country, all over the world," said festival producer Tricia van Klaveren, an independent filmmaker in San Francisco who spent time in a protest camp in southern North Dakota that held hundreds and sometimes thousands of people between August and February. "Standing Rock represents, people really came together and united. History was created."

People in the camp dubbed themselves "water protectors," a reference to the fear that oil and gas pipelines threaten water sources. They couldn't stop Dakota Access — the line to move North Dakota oil to a distribution point in Illinois is set to go into commercial service on Thursday — but the movement has spread to other pipeline projects around the country.

Organizers hope some people will make a return trip for the festival, though the casino has a capacity of only 1,000 people. Many events and panels will be live-streamed online.

"It is our goal that this weekend festival will empower, enlighten, and entertain the Native community and all global citizens," said Mitchell Zephier, a member of the Lower Brule tribe in South Dakota and the festival's founder and executive director.

Among the films being screened are "AWAKE, A Dream from Standing Rock," which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York in April, and "Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World," a documentary about Native musicians. That film, which won an award at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, is an example of another purpose of the event.

"Part of the festival is creating a bridge between the Native community and film industry," van Klaveren said. "Telling more of the stories that haven't been told, and telling them through the Native American lens, the Native American perspective."

The festival is free, though donations are encouraged so there's money to continue the event in future years, van Klaveren said. This year's festival is being funded by the tribe and volunteer labor, she said.

___

Follow Blake Nicholson on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/NicholsonBlake

Allman Brothers Bandmates Haynes, Leavell, Trucks and Betts Pay Tribute to Gregg Allman On Stage and In Print

In emotional tributes on social media and on stages, former members of the Allman Brothers Band show the influence Gregg Allman had on their lives.

Continue reading…

Manager: Allman tried to keep playing music until the end

As Greg Allman neared the end of his life, he tried to maintain some privacy about what was coming.

"He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't," said Michael Lehman, the rock star's manager.

Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel The Allman Brothers Band to superstardom and spawn Southern rock, died Saturday at his home near Savannah, Georgia, at age 69, Lehman said.

Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed liver cancer for Allman's death.

He announced on Aug. 5 that he was "under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic" due to "serious health issues," and canceled his shows later that year. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017.

Funeral arrangements had not been finalized Saturday. But Lehman said Allman would be buried alongside his late brother, founding Allman Brothers guitarist Duane Allman, at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon, where the band got its start nearly five decades ago.

"That's in his wishes," Lehman said.

Tributes to Allman poured out Saturday.

Southern rock and country musician Charlie Daniels said via Twitter, "Gregg Allman had a feeling for the blues very few ever have hard to believe that magnificent voice is stilled forever."

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Allman was raised in Florida by a single mother. Allman idolized his older brother, Duane, eventually joining a series of bands with him. Together they formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band.

The original band featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky, blues-inflected voice of Gregg Allman. Songs such as "Whipping Post," ''Ramblin' Man" and "Midnight Rider" helped define what came to be known as Southern rock and opened the doors for such stars as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

In his 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," Allman described how Duane was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. Based in Macon, the group featured Betts, drummers Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their live album "At Fillmore East" in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom. Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life.

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, Gregg Allman said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

"I can tell when he's there, man," Allman said. "I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there."

The 1970s brought more turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name "Allman and Woman." They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977.

Cher said via Twitter on Saturday, "IVE TRIED.WORDS ARE IMPOSSIBLE."

The Allman Brothers Band split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years.

Starting in 1990, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for "Jessica" the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance. Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

Lehman said Allman had recently finished what would be his final album, titled Southern Blood and scheduled for release in September.

"He actually just listened to a few tracks of it last night and was really passionate and excited for that record to be complete," Lehman said.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt "brand new" at the age of 50. However, he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

The statement on Allman's website says that as he faced health problems, "Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times."

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years "Low Country Blues" in 2011.

"I think it's because you're doing something you love," Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. "I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed."

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

___

Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee.

Rocker Gregg Allman dies at age 69; sang and lived the blues

Gregg Allman, a survivor of tragedy, knew the blues musically and in a painfully personal way.

Raised by a single mother after his father was shot to death, he idolized his guitar-slinging older brother, Duane, and became his musical partner. They formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band, which helped define the Southern rock sound of the 1970s.

Their songs such as "Whipping Post," ''Ramblin' Man" and "Midnight Rider" laid the foundation for the genre and opened the doors for groups like Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel the Allman Brothers Band to superstardom, died Saturday. He was 69.

Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones at his home near Savannah, his manager, Michael Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed cancer for Allman's death.

"It's a result of his reoccurrence of liver cancer that had come back five years ago," Lehman said in an interview. "He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't."

Allman played his last concert in October as health problems forced him to cancel other 2016 shows. He announced Aug. 5 that he was "under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic" due to "serious health issues." Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017.

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida.

In his 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," Allman described how his older brother was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They spent years in bands together, but failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. It featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky blues inflected voice of Gregg Allman.

Based in Macon, Georgia, the group also had drummers Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They reached the pinnacle of the burgeoning music scene, partying to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album "At Fillmore East" in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom. Considered one of the greatest live albums ever made, the two LP record opened with their version of Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues," with Duane Allman on slide guitar. The album introduced fans to their fusion of blues, rock and jazz.

Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life.

Keyboard player Chuck Leavell joined the band following Duane Allman's death and the band continued to soar. Their follow-up to the Fillmore album, "Eat a Peach," became their first top 10 album and featured some of their most popular recordings, including "Melissa" and "Blue Sky."

Gregg Allman said in a 1998 interview with The Associated Press that he and Betts mourned his brother's death in music.

"We used to write songs in a graveyard in Macon," Allman said. "One thing everybody thought was Duane would come back to haunt us if we did not keep going. He had the most passion for music of any man I've ever seen."

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, he said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

"I can tell when he's there, man," Allman said. "I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there."

The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name "Allman and Woman." They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977. Allman said in an interview with Viva magazine in 1977 that he regretted marrying Cher and said that they probably could have fallen in love if it hadn't been for his drug abuse.

The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes.

Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and they won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for "Jessica" the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn't played with the band since.

Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt "brand new" at the age of 50.

"I never believed in God until this," he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. "I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism."

However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years "Low Country Blues" in 2011.

"I think it's because you're doing something you love," Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. "I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed."

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

____

Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee. Associated Press Writer Hillel Italie in New York City contributed to this report.

Gregg Allman Dies: Rockers React

News of Gregg Allman's death was shared by many of his contemporaries on Twitter.

Continue reading…

Southern rock founding father Gregg Allman dies at age 69

Music legend Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel The Allman Brothers Band to superstardom and spawn Southern rock, died Saturday, his manager said. He was 69.

Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones at his home near Savannah, Georgia, his manager, Michael Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed cancer for Allman's death.

"It's a result of his reoccurrence of liver cancer that had come back five years ago," Lehman said in an interview. "He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't."

Allman played his last concert in October as health problems forced him to cancel other 2016 shows. He announced on Aug. 5 that he was "under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic" due to "serious health issues." Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017.

Funeral arrangements had not been finalized Saturday. But Lehman said Allman would be buried alongside his late brother, founding Allman Brothers guitarist Duane Allman, at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon, where the band got its start nearly five decades ago.

"He'll be laid next to his brother, Duane," Lehman said. "That's in his wishes."

Southern rock and country musician Charlie Daniels said via Twitter, "Gregg Allman had a feeling for the blues very few ever have hard to believe that magnificent voice is stilled forever."

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida by a single mother. Allman idolized his older brother, Duane, eventually joining a series of bands with him. Together they formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band.

The original band featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky, blues-inflected voice of Gregg Allman. Songs such as "Whipping Post," ''Ramblin' Man" and "Midnight Rider" helped define what came to be known as Southern rock and opened the doors for such stars as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

In his 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," Allman described how Duane was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. Based in Macon, Georgia, the group featured Betts, drummers Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They partied to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album "At Fillmore East" in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom.

Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life. .

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, Gregg Allman said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

"I can tell when he's there, man," Allman said. "I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there."

The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name "Allman and Woman." They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977.

Cher said via Twitter on Saturday, "IVE TRIED.WORDS ARE IMPOSSIBLE."

The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes.

Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for "Jessica" the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn't played with the band since.

Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

Lehman said Allman had recently finished what would be his final album, titled Southern Blood and scheduled for release in September.

"He actually just listened to a few tracks of it last night and was really passionate and excited for that record to be complete," Lehman said.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt "brand new" at the age of 50.

"I never believed in God until this," he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. "I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism."

However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

The statement on Allman's website says that as he faced health problems, "Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times."

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years "Low Country Blues" in 2011.

"I think it's because you're doing something you love," Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. "I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed."

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

___

Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee.

Gregg Allman Dies

Gregg Allman, the smoky-voiced B-3-playing Southern rock legend who soldiered on after his sibling's motorcycle crash nearly derailed the Allman Brothers Band, has died.

Continue reading…

Roger Waters Kicks Off 2017 'Us + Them' Tour: Set List, Photos, Video

Roger Waters previewed five songs from his new album at his tour opener in Kansas City.

Continue reading…

Roger Waters Kicks Off 2017 'Us + Them' Tour: Video, Set List

Roger Waters previewed five songs from his new album at his tour opener in Kansas City.

Continue reading…

The Latest: Tom Morello, Josh Brolin eulogize Chris Cornell

The Latest on memorial services Friday for late Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

Chris Cornell's memorial service has ended and mourners are headed to the rocker's burial site as Temple of the Dog's "All Night Thing" plays.

The service Friday included eulogies by guitarist Tom Morello and actor Josh Brolin. Linkin Park's Chester Bennington sang "Hallelujah" for mourners, which included numerous members of rock royalty and Cornell's widow and two young children.

Cornell died last week in Detroit at age 52.

He is being laid to rest Friday at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. A public memorial service is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. Pacific.

___

12:45 p.m.

A private memorial service for Soundgarden singer-songwriter Chris Cornell has begun at a Hollywood cemetery.

The memorial is being attended by numerous members of rock royalty, including Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters, Dave Navarro of Jane's Addiction, singer-songwriter Joe Walsh and James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich of Metallica.

The ceremony opened with the playing of one of Cornell's most recent songs, "The Promise."

The 52-year-old rocker died last week in Detroit after performing a show with Soundgarden. Officials said a preliminary autopsy showed he hanged himself, but toxicology tests are pending.

Brad Pitt, Josh Brolin and Pharrell Williams were also attending Friday's service at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. A public memorial is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m.

___

12:10 p.m.

Pharrell Williams, Brad Pitt and numerous rockers including James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich and Dave Navarro are attending a private memorial for late Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell.

Cornell is being laid to rest at a private memorial Friday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Other mourners spotted at the service included Joe Walsh, Dave Grohl, Jane's Addiction frontman Perry Farrell, actor Josh Brolin and guitarist Tom Morello, who performed with Cornell in the supergroup Audioslave.

Cornell's widow and two youngest children were also seen arriving at the service, which will be followed by a public memorial at 3 p.m. Pacific time.

The 52-year-old rocker's Soundgarden bandmates also arrived for the memorial, as did Jerry Cantrell from Alice in Chains.

Cornell died last week in Detroit after performing a concert.

Fans gathered outside the cemetery's gates Friday with one of them playing Soundgarden music from a portable speaker.

___

11:35 a.m.

Fans are lining up outside the memorial where Chris Cornell will be laid to rest on Friday.

Los Angeles resident Melody Andrade brought her 4-year-old son Jude to Hollywood Forever Cemetery to pay her respects to the late Soundgarden singer-songwriter. The pair wore matching T-shirts that read, "Say Hello 2 Heaven."

Andrade says Cornell's death is on par to her with the loss of rockers Elvis Presley and John Lennon.

Cornell was unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room on May 18 after playing a concert with Soundgarden. The 52-year-old Seattle native was a leading voice in the grunge movement that became mainstream in the 1990s.

About a dozen fans gathered outside the cemetery's gates as mourners began to arrive Friday morning for a private memorial service. One person played Soundgarden music from a portable speaker.

A public memorial and viewing of Cornell's final resting place will be begin at 3 p.m. Pacific.

___

1 a.m.

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell is being laid to rest Friday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Representatives for the late singer-songwriter say a private memorial service Friday will be followed by a public viewing of Cornell's burial site.

The 52-year-old was pronounced dead May 18 after he was found unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room after a concert performance. Coroner's officials released say preliminary autopsy results show the singer hanged himself, but full toxicology results remain pending. The singer's family has disputed the findings and claim Cornell may have taken more of an anti-anxiety drug than he was prescribed.

Cornell was a leading voice of the grunge movement in the 1990s. Besides Soundgarden, he scored hits with Temple of the Dog and Audioslave. He is survived by his wife and three children.

Ariana Grande planning benefit concert in Manchester

Ariana Grande has vowed to return to Manchester, England, to give a concert to raise money for the victims of Monday's deadly bombing at her show there.

In a statement both defiant and heavy with emotion, the pop star on Friday wrote to her fans, saying "we won't let hate win" and "we won't let this divide us." She apologized for any pain and offered to "extend my hand and heart and everything I possibly can give to you and yours."

"Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and to live more kindly and generously than we did before," she wrote.

She did not announce a date for the concert.

Grande suspended her Dangerous Woman world tour and canceled several European shows, including two London shows, after the bombing, which left 22 dead. The tour will restart June 7 in Paris.

"From the day I started putting the Dangerous Woman Tour together, I said that this show, more than anything else, was intended to be a safe space for my fans. A place for them to escape, to celebrate. To heal, to feel safe and to be themselves," she wrote. "This will not change that."

In attacking the concert, the bomber targeted an audience full of teenagers and 'tweens — Grande fans who call themselves "Arianators." Some wore kitten ears, like the star of the show.

"They will be on my mind and in my heart everyday and I will think of them with everything I do for the rest of my life," Grande wrote.

Some bands — including Blondie, Kiss and Take That — have canceled shows after the blast but representatives for several music acts — including Aerosmith, Celine Dion, Shawn Mendes, Guns N' Roses and Phil Collins — said they will honor their European dates this summer.

___

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

KISS concert in Manchester canceled after terrorist attacks

KISS has canceled its show at the arena where deadly terrorist attacks occurred at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, earlier this week.

Live Nation announced Friday that the rock group's May 30 concert at Manchester Arena will not take place. Band members Paul Stanley, Gene Simmons, Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer said in a statement that they "are heartbroken by the atrocity committed against the innocent victims of Manchester."

The bombing on Monday night claimed the lives of 22 people, many of them teenagers and their parents. Refunds for the KISS show will be granted to all ticketholders at the point of purchase.

The band said its "thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of those affected and all the people of Manchester at this difficult time."

Kiss Cancel Manchester Concert

The members of Kiss have canceled a planned appearance at the Manchester Arena in the wake of the bombing that killed more than 20 people during an Ariana Grande concert at the venue.

Continue reading…

Hard Rock charts different path for Trump's former casino

Jim Allen once worked for Donald Trump in Atlantic City. Now, the chairman of Hard Rock International is doing all he can to scrub the influence of the man who is now president of the United States from his signature casino.

Hard Rock, the gambling arm of the Seminole Indian tribe of Florida, is working on a remake of the former Trump Taj Mahal casino, which the company bought in March for $50 million, for about 4 cents on the dollar from the $1.2 billion Trump spent to open it in 1990.

This week, Allen revealed more details about Hard Rock's plans for what Trump once described as "the eighth wonder of the world."

The company is upping its investment in the former Taj Mahal from $350 million to $500 million. Allen has already met with the casino workers' union whose strike last year prompted billionaire Carl Icahn to shut the casino down in October, and Allen promises to sign a contract with the union.

Hard Rock soon will announce a partnership to offer internet gambling in multiple jurisdictions, including, eventually, New Jersey. And then there's the de-Trumpification the place needs.

"It's everywhere," Allen said of Trump's influence on the Indian palace-themed Taj Mahal. "The amount of money we're going to have to spend to remove all those minarets and all that purple. Jesus! What were we thinking?"

When the casino opens in summer 2018, it will bear the signature Hard Rock logo and its ubiquitous guitars, and the dozens of domes, minarets and other Trump-style flourishes will be long gone.

"We are committed to a minimum of $500 million we're going to put back into that building," Allen said. "It does us no good to put some guitars on the wall and new carpets, and say, 'I can take 5 or 10 percent of the business from Resorts or Harrah's."

Allen said Hard Rock, with its emphasis on rock 'n' roll and the shared experiences of music and entertainment, will bring new customers to Atlantic City and help the entire market, rather than pulling customers away from competitors.

At the East Coast Gaming Congress on Thursday, a major regional gambling conference, Christopher Baldwin, managing director of Nomura Securities, said Hard Rock's globally known brand should help attract customers interested in more than just gambling.

"Rock 'n' roll and the whole concert scene is something that is appealing," he said. "It's going to be a wide draw demographically."

And Allen all but guaranteed the casino won't have labor troubles. He said he has met with Bob McDevitt, president of Local 54 of the Unite-HERE casino workers union and forged a constructive relationship Allen fully expects to end in a new contract with the union. It was Icahn's failure to reach a contract with the union to restore health insurance and pension benefits wiped out in bankruptcy court that led workers to go on strike last July. Icahn closed the casino Oct. 10.

"There's going to be no dispute with Local 54," Allen said. "We are going to put people back to work. We'll get it done. We'll do it fair."

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC

Heart's Nancy Wilson Remembers Chris Cornell: Exclusive Interview

Heart's Ann and Nancy Wilson have long been intertwined with the Pacific Northwest music scene.

Continue reading…

Lindsey Buckingham Says Fleetwood Mac Had Doubts Over New Buckingham-McVie Album

Lindsey Buckingham has revealed that the members of Fleetwood Mac had doubts over their contributions to the new duets album he wrote with Christine McVie.

Continue reading…

Bret Michaels Says Poison's Fights Were Always About Music

Bret Michaels has insisted that even though he regularly fought with his Poison bandmates in the ‘80s and ‘90s, the disagreements were always about their music, and were never personal.

Continue reading…

Ritchie Blackmore Says He Would Play With Deep Purple Again

Ritchie Blackmore has gotten over his bad feelings about Deep Purple, and he’d play with them again if he was invited, he said.

Continue reading…

Results 1 - 20 of 97 next >
The Other Side of the River - HD2 Listen Live Now