Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

travel

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Air Marshal Leaves Loaded Gun in Bathroom During Delta Flight

Air Marshal Leaves Loaded Gun in Bathroom During Delta Flight

United Airlines wants more time to answer questions about passenger dragging

The CEO of United Airlines has asked for more time to give U.S. senators a full explanation of why a passenger was forcibly dragged off a flight, prompting national outrage.

>>Original story: Man forcibly removed from flight after not voluntarily giving up seat on flight

Senators on the Commerce, Science and Transportation had given United until April 20 to respond to questions. 

“We are in the process of gathering the full set of facts about this incident and finalizing a thorough review of our policy,” United CEO Oscar Munoz wrote. “We look forward to sharing the full results of this ongoing review and the immediate, concrete actions we will take to better serve our customers with the committee.” 

>> Related: United Airlines passengers describe scene as man dragged off flight

Munoz requested an extension until April 27 to answer the senators, whose April 11 letter asked about the actions of the airline, security and the passenger, David Dao. 

The Chicago Department of Aviation also requested more time to answer questions about the incident. 

 >> Read more trending news

“We’re disappointed that neither United Airlines nor the Chicago Department of Aviation has yet provided substantive answers to the straightforward questions we asked about the forcible removal of a passenger on April 9, 2017,” senators on the committee said in a joint statement. “Getting answers for the public about what happened and what can be done to prevent such an incident from happening again is a priority for the members of our committee. We find any further delay in getting necessary answers unacceptable.”

>> Related: United Airlines changes policy after man dragged from plane

Married Man Avoiding Trip With Girlfriend Sends Hijack Hoax Email

Married Man Avoiding Trip With Girlfriend Sends Hijack Hoax Email

Must-see: SeaWorld's last baby killer whale born in Texas

SeaWorld has welcomed its last baby killer whale.

The company announced in a news release that 25-year-old orca Takara gave birth to a calf at 2:33 p.m. CT Wednesday at SeaWorld San Antonio in Texas. Its gender "will be confirmed at a later date," the park said.

“This is an exciting and emotional day for us at SeaWorld, and we are all so proud to share this new killer whale calf with the world after a year and a half of planning and observing and providing all the special care,” Chris Bellows, vice president of zoological operations, said in a statement. “Takara is a great mom and immediately began bonding with and caring for her new baby. Every day, she inspires SeaWorld’s guests to learn more about and do more to protect animals in the wild. She is a true ambassador.”

>> Read more trending news

Visitors soon will be able to see the calf with its mother "during select times," the park said.

Last year, SeaWorld said it would stop breeding killer whales and halt its orca shows by 2019 following protests by animal-rights groups, The Associated Press reported.

Read more here and here.

Travel guru Rick Steves gives $4M apartment complex to YWCA

Travel guide and Edmonds, Washington, native Rick Steves has given an apartment complex to the YWCA.

The 24-unit Lynnwood apartment complex is worth $4 million.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

He bought the complex in 2005 and since then has worked with the YWCA to place low-income single mothers in the building.

Steves said in his blog that one of his pet social causes has long been affordable housing.

“Twenty years ago, I devised a scheme where I could put my retirement savings not into a bank to get interest but into cheap apartments to house struggling neighbors,” he wrote. “Rather than collecting rent, my 'income' would be the joy of housing otherwise desperate people.”

Steves said his project evolved until he eventually owned the complex. His partners, the YWCA and the Rotary Club of Edmonds, then renovated the units with help from local government as well as the Gates Foundation.

Single mothers and their children then moved into Steves' complex. The building, Trinity Place, was at nearly full capacity from 2005 to 2016.

He gave the building this year to the YWCA. His next move was to inspire others who are fortunate to use his plan.

>> Read more trending news

“Working with the YWCA and the Rotary Club of Edmonds, we publicized this creative way of putting a fortunate person's retirement nest egg to work in a powerful way in hopes that others would be inspired to do the same in their communities,” Steves wrote.

Steves said his program is designed so the donor could eventually take back control of the land and retire on it by selling it or renting the apartments. He said he was committed to providing the apartments to the YWCA for 15 years, knowing he had security of the equity in the building if he ever needed it.

But his hope that he’d one day have the financial security to donate it entirely came true this year.

Steves’ Facebook post about the donation has been seen by 1.5 million people so far.

He laid out a timeline for the project and his thoughts about the “investment,” which can be read in his blog here.

United Airlines changes policy after man dragged from plane

United Airlines will no longer allow crew members to bump passengers already on board flights after facing heavy criticism for its removal of a Kentucky physician earlier this month.

>> Read more trending news

The policy change came after video surfaced on social media of officers with the Chicago Department of Aviation dragging Dr. David Dao off Flight 3411 after he declined to relinquish his seat to make room for a crew member.

Dao’s attorney said last week that the confrontation left Dao with a broken nose and a severe concussion. Two of his front teeth were knocked out and he was hospitalized for three days.

>> Related: United passenger suffered broken nose, teeth while being dragged from plane

The change was outlined in an internal email on April 14, The Associated Press reported. Crew members are required to make “must-ride bookings” at least an hour before the flight is scheduled to leave, according to the AP. The airline previously allowed crew members to make bookings until the time of departure.

A spokesperson for United confirmed the policy update to NPR, saying it “ensures situations like Flight 3411 never happen again.” 

"This is one of our initial steps in a review of our policies in order to deliver the best customer experience," the spokesperson told NPR.

>> Related: Delta will now pay passengers up to $9,950 to give up seats

United is not the only airline that has adjusted its policies in the wake of the dragging incident.

Delta Air Lines updated its financial incentive policy to offer up to $9,950 to passengers who volunteer to give up their seats on overbooked flights. American Airlines changed its conditions of carriage and said it would not “involuntarily remove a passenger who has already boarded,” The Washington Post reported.

Air Canada accused of bumping 10-year-old from overbooked flight

Air Canada is the latest airline coming under fire for bumping a passenger on an overbooked flight.

But this time, according to the Vancouver Sun, the passenger in question was 10 years old and the only member of his family barred from the trip.

>> Read more trending news

Brett Doyle had purchased tickets for him and his three family members months ago for a trip from Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, to Costa Rica.

But when he tried to check in and select seats the day before their vacation this month, he was unable to select a set for his 10-year-old son. They spent hours on the phone with Air Canada to correct the issues, then drove to the airport, only to be told the flight was overbooked.

Doyle said he was told by an Air Canada agent that 34 tickets were sold for the 28-seat flight, but that it was unlikely that six passengers would miss a flight over spring break, according to The Vancouver Sun.

They then drove to Moncton to get another flight to make their connection to Costa Rica in Montreal, CBC reported.

That flight was canceled. They then drove to Halifax, staying overnight in a hotel, to be able to get to their final destination.

An airline spokesperson said that companies use a computer algorithm to look at patterns where customers book flights and don’t show up. Isabelle Arthur told The Vancouver Sun that even though Air Canada sells fewer seats than the prediction, there are still times that flights are overbooked and passengers must be moved to a different flight.

Arthur said that children under the age of 12 are usually seated with family, but there was a miscommunication in this case because the airline wasn’t directly dealing with the Doyle family.

Doyle said that Air Canada offered him a $2,500 voucher and may pay for the expenses incurred. The voucher expires in a year.

Click here to read more.

Airline pilot helps feed baby of woman traveling with four children

A photo of a pilot going above and beyond for a passenger is a breath of fresh air given recent airline horror stories.

>> Related: Man forcibly removed from flight after not voluntarily giving up seat on overbooked flight

A photo shared on Instagram shows a Finnair pilot feeding a baby while aboard a flight as a passenger.

>> Read more trending news

A member of the flight crew shared the photo on Instagram, where it quickly went viral, getting more than 1,000 likes.

According to the post, a mother was traveling with her four boys, two of which were babies.

“Naturally one cannot travel with two babies on one’s lap, so we had to solve the dilemma of missing lap, otherwise it would have been a no go for mom and the kids,” the post reads.

Capt. Tom Nystrom was on the flight as a passenger and happily stepped in.

“I have children on my own,” Nystrom told Inside Edition. “So it came naturally to me to help this customer with her babies.”

>> Related: United passenger says he was bumped for ‘higher priority’ passenger, threatened with handcuffs

>> Related: All passengers on United flight 3411 to receive compensation

Scared of flying? Climate change will make it worse

If rising sea levels and bleached coral reefs weren’t bad enough, climate change may also make for bumpier flights.

According to a paper published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, jet streams in both the northern and southern hemispheres are expected to strengthen at the cruising altitudes of aircraft as the globe warms.

>> Read more trending news

That means more wind shear at high altitudes as increases in carbon dioxide concentrations flood the atmosphere, says Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in England.

The study focused on transatlantic flights, noting that “climate change may have important consequences for aviation, because the meteorological characteristics of the atmosphere influence airport operations, flight routes, journey times, and the safety and comfort of passengers and crew.”

“We’re particularly interested in severe turbulence, because that’s the kind of turbulence that’s strong enough to hospitalize people,” Williams told The Washington Post.

Williams said more severe turbulence may force flights to find new routes, which could increase flying time, use of fuel and airplane wear-and-tear.

There are three main types of turbulence: 

  • Convective turbulence is caused by thunderstorms formed as the sun heats the land and the warm moist air rises and cools into clouds. When the clouds can’t hold any more water, it rains, causing a downdraft of cold air and wind. 
  • Clear-air turbulence cannot be detected visually and is not associated with clouds. It occurs typically in the high atmosphere with variations of wind in jet streams — currents of air in the Earth’s atmosphere caused by the planet’s rotation and heating by the sun.
  • Mechanical or mountain turbulence happens when wind encounters tall obstructions, such as mountains, trees or buildings that disrupt its smooth flow. The disrupted air can form eddies on the other side of the obstruction that will jostle the plane.

Williams’ study focused on clear-air turbulence, which he said will increase “significantly” as the climate changes.

Williams said that better turbulence forecasts and mechanisms already on planes will help mitigate severe bumpiness.

“But even an increase in light turbulence can cause greater wear and tear on planes or force pilots to use extra fuel redirecting their flight paths to avoid rough patches,” The Post wrote.

New video shows moments before United Airlines passenger was dragged off plane

The story of Dr. David Dao and United Airlines has dominated headlines since late Sunday. Dao was forcibly removed and injured after boarding a United Airlines flight out of Chicago. Footage went viral that showed Dao arguing with officers before he was removed from the overbooked flight.

>> Man forcibly removed from flight after not voluntarily giving up seat

On Wednesday, a new video began to circulate that showed the moments leading up to Dao’s removal.

>> Watch the video here

Dao was randomly selected to de-board the aircraft when United Airlines personnel needed extra seats in order to travel for work. A Twitter user named Joya Cummings claimed to be a passenger on the flight. Cummings uploaded a video on Tuesday morning that showed what happened before Dao was removed.

>> Merriam-Webster trolls United, defines 'volunteer' after harrowing video goes viral

“I won’t go,” Dao tells officers when they tell him he needs to leave the plane.

“I’m a physician, [I] have work tomorrow.”

>> All passengers on United Flight 3411 to receive compensation

When Dao is informed that he will be dragged off the flight, he threatens to sue United Airlines.

TMZ later uploaded a compilation of videos provided by Cummings.

>> See the clips here

“You can then drag me…I’m not going.” Dao says.

“I’d rather go to jail.”

>> Read more trending news

Dao was ultimately taken off the flight and reportedly injured in the process.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >