Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

technology

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

Researchers: Hackers develop highly customizable cyberweapon aimed at electric grids

Hackers, believed to be affiliated with Russia, have developed a highly customizable cyberweapon capable of taking down electric grids, according to researchers in a pair of countries and multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Researchers say the malware, dubbed CrashOverride or Industroyer, is the first ever designed to attack electric grids, specifically. It has no capabilities geared toward espionage, U.S.-based security firm Dragos Inc. said in a report issued Monday.

CrashOverride in its current form can be easily re-purposed for use in Europe and parts of the Middle East and Asia, according to Dragos. It has already been used once before – in December, when it was used to briefly shut down one-fifth of the electric grid in Kiev, Ukraine, according to The Washington Post. It’s not clear who was behind that attack, although Ukrainian officials blamed Russia, Reuters reported. Officials in Moscow have denied any involvement. 

“With a small amount of tailoring … (CrashOverride) would also be effective in the North American grid,” according to Dragos.

Both Dragos and Slovakian anti-virus firm ESET have issued alerts to governments and infrastructure operators in an effort to prepare them for the possible threat CrashOverride poses, according to Reuters.

"The malware is really easy to re-purpose and use against other targets. That is definitely alarming," ESET malware researcher Robert Lipovsky told Reuters. "This could cause wide-scale damage to infrastructure systems that are vital."

Dragos founder Robert M. Lee told the wire service that while CrashOverride can cause portions of a nation’s electric grid to go down for several days, it is not currently powerful enough to bring down the entirety of a country’s grid.

Still, Sergio Caltagirone, director of threat intelligence for Dragos, described the cyberweapon as “a game charger” in an interview with The Post.

“It’s the culmination of over a decade of theory and attack scenarios,” Caltagirone said.

CrashOverride is just the second malware discovered that was created with the intent to disrupt physical systems, Wired reported. The first known malware created with such a purpose was the 2010 Stuxnet virus, used by the U.S. and Israel to attack Iran’s nuclear program.

“The potential impact here is huge,” Lipovsky told Wired. “If this is not a wakeup call, I don’t know what could be.”

Will your iPhone or iPad get Apple’s latest iOS update?

Apple is constantly updating its products with fun features, but its next revamp may not make it to all of its gadgets. 

>> Read more trending news

The latest version of the company’s operating system, iOS 11, drops in September and includes an augmented reality app, the ability to use two apps at once and a few other facets.

RELATED: Here's what people think about the leaked alleged iPhone 8 design 

But which devices will get the update?

If you purchased your product after 2013, you’re likely in good standing. But double check below to be sure.

iOS 11 is compatible with the following:

  • iPhone 5S and newer
  • Any iPad Air
  • Any iPad Pro
  • iPad mini2 and newer
  • 2017 iPad 
  • 6th generation iPod

RELATED: 7 hidden iPhone tricks you probably never knew about 

That means devices excluded above, such as the iPhone 5C or earlier, will remain on iOS 10 but don’t jump for joy just yet. Every iOS 11 feature may not come to all products listed. 

RELATED: ‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ feature coming to iPhone iOS 11

The feature that allows you to view two apps at once will only be available for iPads not iPad minis, and apps that depend on a stylus require an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil.

Learn more about the upcoming operation system and its new components at CNET. 

‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ feature coming to iPhone iOS 11

Apple made a number of announcements at its Worldwide Developers Conference Monday, but one feature may be a true life-saver.

>> Read more trending news

USA Today reported that Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi announced at the San Jose, California, conference that a “Do Not Disturb While Driving” mode will be available on iPhone and iPads this fall.

The feature is part of the new iOS 11.

“It's all about keeping your eyes on the road,” Federighi said. “When you are driving, you don’t need to be responding to these kind of messages.”

The Verge reported that iMessage, the native text message app on iPhones, will send an automatic message to any texts that come in to say that the user is driving.

The screen will remain dark with muted notifications.

Those not driving can exit from this mode. Users can also mark certain contacts so that any messages they send show up on the phone even if the user is driving, so that “you have the peace of mind that you can get contacted … and that message will go through,” according to Federighi.

A specific release date for iOS 11 has not yet been announced. CNET reported that iOS beta is available for developers Monday.

Amazon earned $70M unlawfully from kids, FTC said. Are you due a refund?

Online retailer Amazon, accused of unlawfully billing parents for more than $70 million in purchases by game-playing children, has settled a case with federal regulators, and refunds are available.

>> Read more trending news 

The deadline for submitting refund requests is May 28, 2018, the Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday.

The charges were made between November 2011 and May 2016, officials said.

Amazon has offered many children’s apps for download to mobile devices such as the Kindle Fire, the FTC said. Children playing games such as “Ice Age Village” could spend unlimited amounts of money to pay for virtual items such as “coins,” “stars” and “acorns” without sufficient parental consent, federal officials said in a 2014 complaint.

“Even Amazon’s own employees recognized the serious problem its process created,” FTC chairwoman Edith Ramirez said in 2014.

The FTC and Amazon agreed last month to end their litigation.

“Since the launch of the Appstore in 2011, Amazon has helped parents prevent purchases made without their permission by offering access to parental controls, clear notice of in-app purchasing, real-time notification for every in-app purchase and refund assistance for unauthorized purchases,” an Amazon spokesman said Tuesday. “The court here affirmed our commitment to customers when it ruled no changes to current Appstore practices were required.

“To continue ensuring a great customer experience, we are happy to provide our customers what we have always provided: refunds for purchases they did not approve. We have contacted all eligible customers who have not already received a refund for unauthorized charges to help ensure their refunds are confirmed quickly.”

The FTC said refund requests can be completed online at https://www.amazon.com/gp/mas/refund-orders/in-apprefund

Customers can go to their Amazon.com accounts and go to the Message Center to find information about requesting a refund under Important Messages. Questions about individual refunds should be directed to Amazon at 866-216-1072, the FTC said.

Ransomware attack: What you need to know

On Friday, ransomware attacks hit tens of thousands of organizations in what is thought to be the biggest cyberextortion attack recorded, according to a report from The Associated Press.

>> Read more trending news

The attack gained attention from media largely after it impacted National Health Service operations in England. It has hit computer networks across the globe in more than 60 countries. The New York Times reported that FedEx in the United States and telecommunications companies Telefónica in Spain and MegaFon in Russia were affected.

Here are things to know about the ransomware attack.

What is ransomware?

Ransomware is malware that locks and disables a user’s computer system and demands ransom in order for the user to regain access to their computer and the files on it. Kurt Baumgartner, a security researcher at Kaspersky Lab, told The AP ransom demands start at $300 and two hours later, increasing to $400, $500 and $600. 

How does the  ransomware attack happen?

The attack exploited a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows that was patched in March but not on machines that had not been updated or patched, according to NPR. It then prompts the pop ups that tells the user their files are encrypted and can be unencrypted if they pay ransom money. Once one computer is affected, the malware spreads itself across the network.

How can future attacks be prevented?

Updating computer operating systems when prompted and maintaining up-to-date software is the best bet against ransomware attacks. Many groups were affected by the attacks because machines had not had updated versions of Windows or had versions that Microsoft was no longer offering patches for.

Texting while driving: Surprising number in one age group say it’s OK

A national survey shows 46 percent of drivers in one age group think texting behind the wheel is just fine.

The most accepting group? People ages 25 to 34, research from insurancequotes.com finds.

>> Read more trending news

The group represents a big slice of millennials, many of whom grew up with mobile devices in hand. The next highest approval rate for sending texts on the go comes from ages 35 to 44, with 22.7 percent.

The survey of 2,000 Americans found 13.7 percent of drivers 18 to 24 were OK with texting while driving, while other age groups approved at 10.1 percent or less.

study released in April that relied on devices in cars found 92 percent of U.S. drivers with cell phones have used them for texting or calling while in a moving vehicle in the past 30 days. Florida received the nation’s worst score for such use after Louisiana.

“I’m not surprised by the results of the study,” state Rep. Emily Slosberg, D-Boca Raton said. “We’re one of four states that don’t make texting while driving a primary offense.”

It’s a secondary offense in Florida, meaning police can’t cite it unless a driver is pulled over for something else. Bills to strengthen penalties did not pass in the legislative session that ended May 8.

>>  Related: 92 percent of motorists use phone while driving; Florida gets study's 2nd worst score

Texting was involved in 6 percent of accidents and cell phone use including talking was a factor in 26 percent of crashes, the National Safety Council found in 2015. Overall phone use in accidents has been rising for several years, researchers said.

Is it acceptable to send text messages while driving?

Age/yes answers

18-24 -- 13.7%

25-34 -- 46.3%

35-44 -- 22.7 %

45-54 -- 10.1%

55-64 -- 5.6%

65-74 -- 1.4%

75+ -- 0.1%

FIRST LOOK: Tesla's solar roofs are here

Tesla is officially taking orders for its solar glass roof, which is said to be cheaper than a regular roof with an "infinity warranty."

>> Read more trending news

Elon Musk tweeted on Wednesday that the solar roof can be ordered in "almost any country." The roofs will be deployed this year in the U.S. and overseas in 2018. 

The roofs will come in textured, smooth, Tuscan and slate. 

The roofs are made with tempered glass and are more than three times stronger than standard roofing tiles, according to Tesla's website.

Learn more here.

Amazon Echo Show: 5 things to know about the 'stupendously powerful' device

Amazon officially unveiled the Amazon Echo Show, its first smart speaker with a built-in touchscreen, Tuesday.

Here are five things to know about the new device:

>> Creepy or useful? Amazon’s new Echo Look selfie camera wants to help you get dressed

Tech specs 
  • 7-inch display
  • Weight: 2.5 pounds
  • Dual 2-inch stereo speakers powered by Dolby
  • 5-megapixel front-facing camera

>> Read more trending news

Features
  • Built-in camera
  • Voice-assistance from Alexa; includes at least 12,000 skills or tasks
  • Bluetooth
  • Touchscreen display offers more on-screen information (step-by-step recipe instructions, 10-day weather reports) and can be used to play videos.
  • Music display features: Connects to Spotify, Pandora, iHeartRadio, TuneIn and offers real-time song lyrics, custom stations, curated playlists, album art
  • Organization features: Ask Alexa to start timers, manage calendars, create to-do lists and sync all the information with the Alexa app.
  • Drop In feature: Free voice-call feature (similar to Apple’s FaceTime) for those with the Alexa app, Echo, Echo Dot or Echo Show to message or call each other.
  • Compatible with smart home devices such as cameras, lights, fans, garages, sprinklers and more, so you can potentially ask Alexa to turn off the lights without getting off the couch

>> On AJC.com: Someone asked Amazon’s Alexa about the CIA and the answers are hilarious

What are critics saying?

Wired Magazine called the device and its abilities “stupendously powerful” and lauded the touchscreen feature that now complements Alexa’s voice control. 

“A screen in the Echo universe means there’s almost nothing you and Alexa can’t do,” Wired’s David Pierce wrote.

But The Verge noted some of the device’s limitations, including a “slightly unsettling” feature in Drop In, the voice-call feature. Drop In allows users to white-list individual contacts who will be able to pop up and start a video chat on your Echo Show unannounced.

“I personally cannot imagine ever letting my friends have this power, but maybe that’s just me.” tech critic The Verge’s Chaim Gartenberg said.

Other limitations include Amazon’s single-user system, which would give anyone in the house access to things like to-do lists and would set off all your devices if someone calls you via Drop In.

In addition, because the device is built to run Echo skills and not apps, users won’t be able to run Amazon’s own Fire OS apps, or anything from the Google Play Store, Gartenberg said.

>> On AJC.com: 7 hidden perks of Amazon Prime you probably never knew about

How to buy

The Amazon Echo Show is currently available to pre-order on Amazon for $229.99 in black or white. The device will be released June 28. 

Amazon is also offering a buy two, save $100 deal with promo code SHOW2PACK.

How to use

Plug the Echo Show into a power outlet, connect to the internet and ask Alexa.

More at Amazon.com.

Are your kids safe? Predators reaching children through online games

MaryBeth Reeves is used to a lot of chatting. The Georgia mother of quadruplet 10-year-old daughters says it’s rarely quiet in their home. What she wasn’t used to were the chats taking place while her girls played games online.

>> Watch the news report here

Her girls use Roblox, a multiplayer game site that allows players to communicate with each other.

“There’s a bunch of different people that can be on a game and then there’s, like, this chat that you can type in what you want to say. Then you can communicate with other people, say if you’re on a team,” 10-year-old Hannah Reeves explained.

Not long ago, a few players stopped talking about the game and began asking the girls questions about themselves.

“He said, ‘You’re cute,’ and I said, ‘Ew, gross!’” Gwendolyn Reeves said.

Her sister, Isabella, said someone asked her if she’d like to go out on a date.

Reeves said she was unaware that was possible. She and her husband monitor their girls’ online activity closely. They have controls on each laptop and tablet that turn them on and off and allow them to track what sites the kids visit.

ON WSBTV.com:

>> No escort section? No problem for prostitutes on Backpage.com>> Never get another filling? Drug could regrow teeth>> Home Depot under investigation for work that may have put families in danger

“When the first girl told me someone asked her out on a date I thought she was making it up,” Reeves said. “There was a sinking feeling in the bottom of my stomach.”

She immediately had a conversation with her girls.

“We just have to try to educate them as much as possible. Keeping them in the dark is not going to help them,” Reeves told WSB-TV’s Dave Huddleston.

Sky Valley Police Chief Vaughn Estes told WSB-TV that is the exact right approach for parents to take. Estes worked for the GBI in its high technology investigative unit and says pedophiles prey on children using subtle techniques to gain their confidence and lure them in.

“We’ve worked cases where people have talked children into doing things in front of their webcams that the parents walk into the room and they are horrified when they discover,” Estes said.

He also says active parenting should be the first line of defense to protect your child.

“Know what your children are doing. Know what they are on. If they are in that room with that computer, you don't know who is on the other side of that computer,” Estes said. “If their phone has a password on it and you, the parent, does not know it, then you need to get the phone away from them because there is nothing on there that a 14-year-old should not be able to show you.”

>> Read more trending news

He says when parents are aware and kids speak up, it makes investigating this type of behavior easier.

WSB-TV’s Huddleston also spoke with Eliza Harrell, a director with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Harrell says that while knowing what your kids are doing online is important, they also need to understand online gaming safety features.

“Most companies are more than willing to help,” Harrell said.

Roblox, the site the Reeves girls use, filters out offensive language and allows parents to choose who their children chat with or to turn chat off altogether. They also allow kids to report abuse and block players that ask offensive questions.

The company told WSB-TV that every abuse report is investigated and players can be banned from the site.

All three girls in the Reeves house who were approached blocked the player asking the questions, and one of them was able to report the activity before the player left the game.

Reeves says she’s thankful they spoke up and wants other parents to be prepared.

“Anything I can do to let other parents know that that happens,” she said.

WSB-TV's Huddleston was joined by DeKalb County Police, Common Sense Media and Roblox for a LIVE Q&A with the experts about how to protect your children online.

>> Click here to watch

 

Facebook accused of helping advertisers target 'insecure' teens

Facebook is doing damage control after a new report suggests the company helped advertisers target teens based on their emotional state.

A 23-page leaked report from an Australian newspaper included a presentation to a bank that showed Facebook's ability to identify when young users are feeling especially insecure, stressed, anxious or overwhelmed and outlined “moments when young people need a confidence boost,” the paper reported.

>> RELATED: ‘10 concerts’ Facebook meme may reveal answer to security questions, professor says 

“Anticipatory emotions are more likely to be expressed early in the week, while reflective emotions increase on the weekend. Monday to Thursday is about building confidence; the weekend is for broadcasting achievements,” authors of the report wrote.

According to Forbes, parts of the document written by Facebook employees Andy Sinn and David Fernandez focused on body image and weight loss and how image-recognition tools are used on Instagram and Facebook.

>> Read more trending news

The Australian paper argued the world’s biggest social network is collecting “psychological insights” on teens based on internal Facebook data.

In response to the criticism, Facebook said it does not target anyone based on their emotional state and someone feeling depressed would not receive different ads compared to someone feeling happy.

>> On AJC.com: The more you use Facebook, the worse you feel, study says

“We have opened an investigation to understand the process failure and improve our oversight. We will undertake disciplinary and other processes as appropriate,” Facebook told the paper.

Later, the company released a separate statement:

“On May 1, 2017, The Australian posted a story regarding research done by Facebook and subsequently shared with an advertiser. The premise of the article is misleading. Facebook does not offer tools to target people based on their emotional state.

The analysis done by an Australian researcher was intended to help marketers understand how people express themselves on Facebook. It was never used to target ads and was based on data that was anonymous and aggregated.

Facebook has an established process to review the research we perform. This research did not follow that process, and we are reviewing the details to correct the oversight.”

>> On Boston25News.com: AG: Companies can't target ads to women in abortion clinics

This isn’t the first time Facebook has been in hot water for targeting users.

In 2014, according to MarketWatch, Facebook targeted nearly 700,000 users without their knowledge as part of a psychological experiment to determine if their emotional state changed based on how much positive or negative content they consumed on their news feeds.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >