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UNC football player accused of raping fellow student

A student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is speaking out after she said she was raped in February, but the university took no action.

"My life has changed forever, while the person who assaulted me remains as a student and a football player on this campus," Delaney Robinson said Tuesday. 

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Robinson said her attacker is Allen Artis, a linebacker on their school's football team. The 19-year-old sophomore told the media that she was taking the incident public because she was dissatisfied with how the college was handling the alleged rape.

"I did everything a rape victim is supposed to do. I reported it. I allowed the rape kit to be taken. I gave a statement. I cooperated with law enforcement and the Title IX office," Robinson said in a statement. "But six months later, the university has done nothing. I'm taking this public stand not for me but for the other students on campus who are not protected, despite what the university tells us."

Robinson and her attorney spent six months pushing for Artis' expulsion, The Daily Mail reported.

According to Robinson, the assault occurred at on-campus housing on Valentine's Day. She told authorities that Artis, 21, laid on top of her, pinning her down with his weight while raping her. 

A photo taken by Robinson shows purple marks on her neck that are said to be bruises inflicted by Artis on the night of the rape.

"Yes, I was drinking that night on Valentine's Day," Robinson said. "I'm underage, and I take responsibility for that, but that doesn't give anyone the right to violate me. I did not deserve to be raped."

Robinson said she went to a hospital after the incident and told a sexual-assault nurse what she could remember of the incident. She had a rape kit completed and was later questioned by the university's Department of Public Safety investigators, who filed an incident report. The rape kit documented "blunt force trauma" and "bruising consistent with a physical assault."

But Robinson, originally from Apex, North Carolina, said she was "quizzed" with "humiliating" and accusatory" questions.

"Did I lead him on? Have I hooked up with him before? Do I often have one-night stands? Did I even say no? What is my sexual history? How many men have I slept with? I was treated like a suspect," she said she was asked.

Robinson said she later heard a recording of Artis' interview with the DPS.

"They told him, 'Don't sweat it, just keep on living your life and playing football,'" she said. "They even laughed with him when he told them how many girls' phone numbers he had managed to get on the same night he raped me."

According to Robinson's lawyer, Denise Branch UNC Chapel Hill’s Title IX office, the unit that examines sexual discrimination at universities, has been investigating the case. 

Orange County District Attorney Jim Woodall said a felony investigation is still underway.  

"There is no question that there was physical contact, but what the circumstances are surrounding the contact are what investigators are trying to determine."

"The Hunting Ground," a CNN documentary that spotlighted sexual assaults on college campuses in the country, reported that UNC Chapel Hill received 136 sexual assault reports between 2001 and 2013, but that none of the reports resulted in expulsions.

In a statement, the university said it "is deeply committed to the safety and well-being of ... students and takes all allegations about sexual violence or sexual misconduct extremely seriously."

Artis was charged Tuesday with sexual battery and assault on a female after Robinson requested a misdemeanor warrant, allowable under North Carolina law. Artis turned himself in at a magistrate's court Wednesday morning.

He was released on a $5,000 unsecured bond, and his next court date is Sept. 29.

Artis, originally from Marietta, Georgia, was suspended from the football team pending the outcome of the case.

Robinson and her father, Stacey Robinson, have both released statements. 

Georgetown University to make reparations for past ties to slavery

Georgetown University is taking steps to atone for its historical ties to slavery. 

The plan includes giving the descendants of slaves the same admissions advantages that children of alumni receive. Two buildings on campus will also be renamed.

One will honor Anne Marie Becraft, an African-American woman who opened a school for black girls in the Georgetown area, and the other will commemorate one of the slaves sold to help pay off the university's debt.

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In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 slaves to pay off some of the school's debt. The slaves were uprooted from Maryland and sent to Louisiana.

The university has addressed its history with slavery before, but recently, a committee appointed to determine how the university should address its history found that slavery was deeply rooted in Georgetown's founding. 

Profits from the sale of slaves and from plantations run by slaves were a planned source of funding for the school, and many of the campus' early buildings were built, at least in part, by slaves.

Georgetown's investigation started in August, and the student body began putting pressure on the university last year to open a dialogue about its history with slavery.

The steps announced this week stopped short of calls for scholarships for the descendants of slaves, but the university claims its efforts won't end with Thursday's announcement. 

University of Chicago won't support 'trigger warnings,' 'intellectual safe spaces'

A letter sent out by University of Chicago officials warned incoming students that they won't find any "intellectual safe spaces" on the school's campus.

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The letter goes on to acknowledge that the university is committed to "freedom of inquiry and expression" and encourages each student to challenge and broaden their perspectives on issues.

"You will find that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion and even disagreement," the letter read. "At times, this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.

"Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support so-called 'trigger warnings,' we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual 'safe spaces' where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own."

The letter pointed students to more information on freedom of expression and quotes a former president of the university, Hanna Holborn Gray, as saying that "education should not be intended to make people comfortable, it is meant to make them think."

The University of Chicago is ranked as one of the top and most selective universities in the country. Less than 8 percent of the more than 31,000 people who applied to enter the class of 2020 were accepted by the school, according to The Chicago Maroon.

This essay about Costco got a high school senior into 5 Ivy League schools

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Most high school seniors have received college acceptance letters by April and must decide which schools they'll attend by May. 

For those with more than one offer, the decision can be tough -- especially if you're Brittany Stinson, a graduating senior from Wilmington, Delaware.

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Stinson recently got accepted to five Ivy League schools -- Yale, Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Dartmouth and Cornell -- and Stanford University.

Stanford's acceptance rate for the class of 2020 hit a record low of 4.69 percent -- a lower rate than any of the Ivy League schools. The highest acceptance rate of the schools she was accepted to was at Cornell, where only 13.96 percent of applicants were accepted.

"I'm sort of still in shock. I don't think I've processed everything yet," she told Business Insider.

Stinson, who compared Costco Wholesale to the larger world in her college admissions essay, shared the essay online:  

Prompt: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. "Managing to break free from my mother’s grasp, I charged. With arms flailing and chubby legs fluttering beneath me, I was the ferocious two­ year old rampaging through Costco on a Saturday morning. My mother’s eyes widened in horror as I jettisoned my churro; the cinnamon­sugar rocket gracefully sliced its way through the air while I continued my spree. I sprinted through the aisles, looking up in awe at the massive bulk products that towered over me. Overcome with wonder, I wanted to touch and taste, to stick my head into industrial­sized freezers, to explore every crevice. I was a conquistador, but rather than searching the land for El Dorado, I scoured aisles for free samples. Before inevitably being whisked away into a shopping cart, I scaled a mountain of plush toys and surveyed the expanse that lay before me: the kingdom of Costco.  "Notorious for its oversized portions and dollar­fifty hot dog combo, Costco is the apex of consumerism. From the days spent being toted around in a shopping cart to when I was finally tall enough to reach lofty sample trays, Costco has endured a steady presence throughout my life. As a veteran Costco shopper, I navigate the aisles of foodstuffs, thrusting the majority of my weight upon a generously filled shopping cart whose enormity juxtaposes my small frame. Over time, I’ve developed a habit of observing fellow patrons tote their carts piled with frozen burritos, cheese puffs, tubs of ice cream, and weight­loss supplements. Perusing the aisles gave me time to ponder. Who needs three pounds of sour cream? Was cultured yogurt any more well­mannered than its uncultured counterpart? Costco gave birth to my unfettered curiosity.  "While enjoying an obligatory hot dog, I did not find myself thinking about the ‘all beef’ goodness that Costco boasted. I instead considered finitudes and infinitudes, unimagined uses for tubs of sour cream, the projectile motion of said tub when launched from an eighty foot shelf or maybe when pushed from a speedy cart by a scrawny seventeen year old. I contemplated the philosophical: If there exists a thirty­three ounce jar of Nutella, do we really have free will? I experienced a harsh physics lesson while observing a shopper who had no evident familiarity of inertia's workings. With a cart filled to overflowing, she made her way towards the sloped exit, continuing to push and push while steadily losing control until the cart escaped her and went crashing into a concrete column, 52” plasma screen TV and all. Purchasing the yuletide hickory smoked ham inevitably led to a conversation between my father and me about Andrew Jackson’s controversiality. There was no questioning Old Hickory’s dedication; he was steadfast in his beliefs and pursuits – qualities I am compelled to admire, yet his morals were crooked. We both found the ham to be more likeable–and tender. "I adopted my exploratory skills, fine tuned by Costco, towards my intellectual endeavors. Just as I sampled buffalo­chicken dip or chocolate truffles, I probed the realms of history, dance and biology, all in pursuit of the ideal cart–one overflowing with theoretical situations and notions both silly and serious. I sampled calculus, cross­country running, scientific research, all of which are now household favorites. With cart in hand, I do what scares me; I absorb the warehouse that is the world. Whether it be through attempting aerial yoga, learning how to chart blackbody radiation using astronomical software, or dancing in front of hundreds of people, I am compelled to try any activity that interests me in the slightest.  "My intense desire to know, to explore beyond the bounds of rational thought; this is what defines me. Costco fuels my insatiability and cultivates curiosity within me at a cellular level. Encoded to immerse myself in the unknown, I find it difficult to complacently accept the 'what'; I want to hunt for the 'whys' and dissect the 'hows.' In essence, I subsist on discovery."

Incredibly honored and blessed to be officially admitted to Yale, Columbia, The University of Pennsylvania as a Benjamin...Posted by Brittany Stinson on Thursday, March 31, 2016

Satirical article claims Stanford admitted zero students to class of 2020

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In what has been called a "fun April Fool's" column, the New York Times identifies Stanford University as the most selective institution of higher education in the country after an announcement that it admitted less than five percent of applicants to the class of 2020.

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“We had exceptional applicants, yes, but not a single student we couldn’t live without,” the New York Times reported an anonymous Stanford administrator as saying. “In the stack of applications that I reviewed, I didn’t see any gold medalists from the last Olympics -- Summer or Winter Games -- and while there was a 17-year-old who’d performed surgery, it wasn’t open heart or a transplant or anything like that. She’ll thrive at Yale.”

The article, which has been called satirical but not yet identified as such by the author, Frank Bruni, is intended to bring attention to the "absurdity of college admissions today."

Last year, the Stanford received a record number of applications -- 42,487 -- and invited less than 2,500 high school seniors to join Stanford’s class of 2019.

The five percent admission rate was a record low until this year's 4.69 percent rate. 

“This is the worst thing that has happened to anyone, ever,” Bruni quoted a high school senior from Washington, D.C., as saying. "Whether she accepts an offer of admission from M.I.T. or one from Duke, she’ll defer enrollment and take a gap year to regain her confidence," he wrote, poking fun at the sentiments of discouraged young people and also pointing out the privilege and sense of entitlement stereotypically embraced by many young millennials. 

A total of 1,318 high school seniors were accepted to Sanford's newest undergraduate class on Friday. An additional 745 early action students were accepted in December. The 2,063 admits came from a pool of 43,997 applicants, the largest in Stanford’s history. Anoter 3.6 percent of applicants were given a place on Stanford’s waitlist, according to The Stanford Daily. This year's admits come from 50 states and 76 countries. 

“We are honored by the interest in Stanford and overwhelmed by the exceptional accomplishments of the students admitted to the Class of 2020,” Richard Shaw, Stanford dean of admissions and financial aid, told the Stanford Report. “Our admitted students reflect the deep and profound diversity of the world in which we live. We believe these students will impact that world in immeasurable ways.”

Though rejecting so many applicants seems like grounds for financial concern, Stanford donors haven't pulled back, the New York Times reported. In fact, the rise in the school's donations might be growin "in tandem with its exclusivity."

Admitted students have until May 1 to accept Stanford’s offer.

Read the New York Times piece here.

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