Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

world

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

UK lowers security level from ‘critical’ to ‘severe’

Great Britain lowered its security threat level from “critical” to “severe” on Saturday, Prime Minister Theresa May said.

>> Read more trending news

Earlier, police hunting a suspected network behind Salman Abedi, the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday night during a concert in Manchester, said they had made two further arrests overnight as they closed in on other possible cell members, Reuters reported. 

As a result, soldiers who have been assisting police would be withdrawn from Britain's streets at midnight on Monday.

"A significant amount of police activity has taken place over the last 24 hours and there are now 11 suspects in custody," May said.

May cautioned, however, that the lesser threat is still a dangerous one.

"The public should be clear about what this means. A threat level of severe means an attack is highly likely,” she said. “The country should remain vigilant."

The threat assessment has returned to the level it was at prior to the Manchester attack.

In Manchester, events planned around the spring bank holiday will go ahead with additional security, including a significant number of armed officers, police said. British officers do not usually carry guns, CNN reported.

Events include the Manchester Games, the Great Manchester Run, and a stadium show by bands including The Courteeners, all of which are likely to attract big crowds. This weekend also marks the start of Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar, CNN reported.

 

 

Turkey issues arrest warrant for NBA star Enes Kanter

The Turkish government issued an arrest warrant for Oklahoma City Thunder center Enes Kanter, accusing him of being a member of a terror group, according to The Daily Sabah, a pro-government Turkish newspaper.

>> Read more trending news

Kanter was detained at a Romanian airport over the weekend because his passport was canceled by Turkey. Kanter documented the experience on Twitter. 

Kanter has been a longtime critic of controversial Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and is a vocal supporter of Muslim spiritual leader Fethullah Gulen, a man Erdogan blamed for a coup attempt last year.

After the news of the warrant broke Friday, Kanter tweeted, "Stand For What You Believe!"

Gulen, a Muslim spiritual leader, has spent the last 15 years in exile in Pennsylvania. Gulen has denied claims of involvement with the coup, ESPN reported.

The warrant, ESPN reported, refers to “Kanter's alleged use of an encrypted messaging application called Bylock, Sabah said, which Turkey claims was especially created for Gulen supporters."

n Turkey, Kanter's Twitter account is blocked. In the Daily Sabah last summer, Kanter's father, Mehmet, announced the family was disowning him. Kanter said he hasn't spoken with his family in almost two years.

Kanter was detained last week in Romania after the Turkish government revoked his passport. In a video about it, Kanter said Erdogan is the "Hitler of this century."

Using his green card, Kanter returned to the United States via London on Monday. He told reporters he plans on becoming a U.S. citizen.

"Right now I am country-less," Kanter said in Manhattan. "I am open to adoption definitely. I am going to try to become an American citizen."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

 

British Airways says computer glitches causing delays

Computer problems are causing long lines and flight delays for British Airways passengers worldwide, the BBC reported Saturday. Airline officials apologized for the "global system outage" and said they were "working to resolve the problem as quickly as possible."

>> Read more trending news 

Heathrow Airport said it was "working closely" with British Airways to solve the issue.

British Airways announced later Saturday that it had canceled all flights from Heathrow and Gatwick for the rest of the day, according to Sky News.

It is not known how many flights were affected, but passengers have reported issues at a number of airports through social media.

Journalist Martyn Kent told the BBC he was sitting on a plane for 90 minutes at Heathrow Airport. He said the airplane’s captain told passengers the computer problems were "catastrophic."

Philip Bloom said he had been waiting in Belfast on board a Heathrow-bound flight for two hours.

"We haven't been told very much just that there is a worldwide computer system failure,” he told the BBC. “We were told that we couldn't even get on other flights because they are unable to see what flights we can be moved to."

Bloom later said that his flight was able to take off and fly to London.

Afghanistan car bomb explosion kills 18

At least 18 people were killed and six others were injured Saturday in a car bomb explosion in eastern Afghanistan, CNN reported Saturday.

The attack occurred near a bus station in the city of Khost, said Najib Danish, spokesman for the interior ministry.

There has been no claim of responsibility.

Manchester crowd sings ‘Don’t Look Back In Anger’

The moment when a crowd of Manchester residents joined a woman to sing a rendition of the Oasis song “Don’t Look Back in Anger” has gone viral.

>> Read more trending news

The impromptu performance came at the end of a nationwide minute’s silence to honor the 22 people who were killed in Monday’s bombing at Manchester Arena, the Guardian reported. About 400 people had gathered at St Ann’s Square to mark the moment.

After the silence, Lydia Bernsmeier-Rullow, clutching a bouquet, then tentatively began to sing the opening verse to the Manchester band’s 1996 hit and the crowd soon joined in, the Guardian reported.

The video was shared thousands of times on social media and broadcast across the world, including by Oasis guitarist Noel Gallagher.

UK police arrest 9th man in Manchester bombing probe

Police in Great Britain investigating the Manchester Arena bombing have arrested a ninth man while continuing to search addresses associated with the bomber who killed 22 people on Monday, The Associated Press reported Friday.

>> Read more trending news

The name of the man arrested Friday and those of the eight previous detainees have not been released. No one has yet been charged in the bombing, the AP reported.

Britain’s security level has been upgraded to “critical,” which means officials believe another attack may be imminent.

Authorities are seeking possible links between the bomber, Salman Abedi, and militants in Manchester and elsewhere, the AP reported.

 

Photos: Queen Elizabeth visits Manchester attack victims at children's hospital

Queen Elizabeth II visited Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, where she spoke to victims of the Manchester terrorist attack, as well as the doctors and nurses treating them.

Photos: Trumps meet Pope Francis at Vatican

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their entourage – including first daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner – met Pope Francis at the Vatican during the president’s trip to Italy.

Trump condemns 'evil losers' behind Manchester attack

President Donald Trump on Tuesday slammed the perpetrators behind Monday night’s suicide bomb attack in Manchester, England, that claimed 22 lives and injured nearly 60 other people.

>> Read more trending news

Greater Manchester police said a person detonated a suicide bomb Monday near one of the entrances to Manchester Arena, following an Ariana Grande concert. Police said children were among those killed or injured.

Speaking alongside Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, Trump offered his condolences and condemned the “wicked ideology” that led to the attack.

“(There were) so many young, beautiful, innocent people -- living and enjoying their lives -- murdered by evil losers in life,” Trump said. “I won't call them monsters, because they would like that term. They would think that's a great name. I will call them, from now on, losers, because that's what they are: losers.”

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility Tuesday for the attack, although authorities said they had yet to uncover any connections between suspected suicide bomber Salman Abedi, 22, and any wider terrorist organization.

“The terrorists and extremists, and those who give them aid and comfort, must be driven out from our society forever,” Trump said. “This wicket ideology must be obliterated, and innocent life must be protected. All civilized nations must join together to protect human life and the sacred right of our citizens to live in safety and peace.”

The White House said Trump spoke with British Prime Minister Theresa May after the attack and offered his condolences and support on behalf of the United States.

"We stand in absolute solidarity with the people of the United Kingdom," Trump wrote Tuesday morning in a tweet.

Trump’s remarks came during his first foreign trip as president, a sweep of five countries over nine days. The president was in Rome on Tuesday for a meeting with Pope Francis. He has already visited Saudi Arabia and Israel.

Manchester attack: What we know about suspected suicide bomber Salman Abedi 

British authorities on Tuesday identified the suicide bomber believed to have blown himself up outside an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, as 22-year-old Salman Abedi.

>> Read more trending news

Greater Manchester police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins confirmed Abedi’s identity Tuesday but declined to comment further, citing the need for the coroner to confirm the identity.

Authorities said Abedi detonated a suicide bomb near one of the entrances to the Manchester Arena on Monday, just after an Ariana Grande concert wrapped up. The attack killed 22 people and injured 59 others, officials said.

Here’s what we know:

Abedi was a British man of Libyan origin who was born in 1994Politico Europe reported. His parents were emigrants who settled in England and later moved back to Libya, The Telegraph reported. He was the second youngest of four children.

Police were warned about Abedi’s “extreme and violent views” several years before Monday’s deadly bombing, according to BBC News.

A Muslim community worker, who was not identified, told the news station that two people who knew Abedi from college called police separately to warn authorities that “he was supporting terrorism.”

The community worker told BBC News that the calls were made about five years ago after Abedi said, among other things, that “being a suicide bomber was OK.”

Police declined to comment on the claim.

Abedi’s “links with ISIS are proven,” France’s Interior Minister said Wednesday, according to Politico Europe.

He traveled to Libya before Monday’s attack and had links with the Islamic State group, Politico Europe reported, citing French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb.

“Today, we only know what British investigators have told us – someone of British nationality, of Libyan origin, who suddenly after a trip to Libya, then probably to Syria, becomes radicalized and decides to carry out this attack,” Collomb told BFMTV.

Abedi lived at a home 3.5 miles from Manchester Arena, according to The New York Times. A law enforcement official told the newspaper that Abedi's ID was found at the scene of the bombing.

Police arrested two of Abedi's brothers and his father in the aftermath of the attack, according to multiple reports.

Anti-terrorism officials in Libya told The Associated Press that Abedi’s father, Ramadan Abedi, was arrested Wednesday for interrogation. One of Salman Abedi’s brothers, Hashim, was arrested Tuesday in Libya on suspicion of having links with the Islamic State group, according to BBC News. Another of Salman Abedi’s brothers, Ismail, was arrested Tuesday in Manchester.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >