Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

opinion

9 items
Results 1 - 9 of 9

Judge Jeanine to Clinton: ‘Get back in the woods’

In her Opening Statement segment on Fox News’ “Justice with Judge Jeanine” program Saturday night, Jeanine Pirro criticized Hillary Clinton for playing the “poor me” card. Pirro also said that the former Democratic presidential candidate was continuing to make excuses for her election loss last November. Pirro also took some shots at former President Bill Clinton during her monologue.

>> Read more trending news 

"We've had it with you Clintons claiming victimhood," Pirro said, after Hillary Clinton told an audience she would have been president if the election came before FBI Director Jim Comey sent a letter to Congress in October.

Pirro added that since the former first lady previously took responsibility for her loss, she should stop blaming "boogeymen" such as Comey and others.

“Hillary, snap out of it,” Pirro said on “Justice.” “You’re a two-time loser who lost because you were a lousy candidate.

“The two of you haven’t followed the rules since the day you both showed up in your bell bottoms in Arkansas,” Pirro said. “You’re a loser, Hillary. Face it. Face it. And get back in the woods.”

Sen. Rand Paul condemns U.S. airstrikes on Syria

In the wake of a heinous chemical weapons attack in Syria on Tuesday that reportedly killed 86 people including 27 children, on Thursday night President Trump ordered airstrikes on the air base from which that attack was launched. Trump’s order was his first direct assault on a foreign nation through executive order. This decision is troublesome to many Trump supporters and others who thought the president’s anti-Iraq war stance and arguments against nation building might prevent him from such action.

>> RELATED: U.S. fires more than 50 cruise missiles into Syria

Among them is Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who spent the week arguing that any military strikes against Syria would require a congressional declaration of war.

>> RELATED: Rand Paul says no war with Syria without congressional approval

In a series of tweets in response to the strikes, Paul said late Thursday, “While we all condemn the atrocities in Syria, the United States was not attacked. The President needs Congressional authorization for military action as required by the Constitution, and I call on him to come to Congress for a proper debate.”

“Our prior interventions in this region have done nothing to make us safer and Syria will be no different,” Paul said.

>> RELATED: Rand Paul reminds President Trump that he opposed Syria intervention back in 2013

Trump had a similar position in 2013 when President Obama was considering a U.S.-led strike on Syria.

The missile strikes on Thursday were fired from a U.S. Navy ship in the Mediterranean Sea. President Trump released a short video explaining that the attacks were in retaliation for the chemical attacks reported to be carried out by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

Writer disclosure: I co-authored the 2011 book ‘The Tea Party Goes to Washington’ with Sen. Rand Paul.

Donald Trump's KKK and Communist China problem

Let’s review the weekend Donald Trump had:

1. He danced around his receiving support from David Duke and the Ku Klux Klan, later blaming a “bad earpiece” for the reason he was able to repeat Duke’s name to host Jake Tapper but unable to say he didn’t want their support. (Click here if you're on mobile)

Yes, on Friday Trump had disavowed Duke’s support. Which, one might think, should have made it easy for him to repeat that disavowal during the interview Sunday as long as he could hear the name, which he clearly could. Rather, this looks like yet another instance of Trump — the hilariously monikered “truth teller” — talking out of both sides of his mouth as he makes it up on the fly. In other words, it’s another instance of Trump showing just how ill-suited he is for the presidency. (Note that when Duke ran for president as a Republican in 1992, the party did what it could to keep him off ballots.)

>>Related: Donald Trump is inconsistent on KKK, David Duke

2. He took the bait and retweeted a quote by Benito Mussolini — which had been tweeted by an account whose handle was explicitly a reference to the Italian fascist:

Trump tried to explain this away as his being interested in “interesting quotes,” not actual fascists. But this particular quote is not some innocuous thought about life in general: It’s the kind of thing a dictator says to justify his violence toward his own citizens. Which leads us to …

3. Trump’s quotes about the Tiananmen Square massacre from a 1990 interview with Playboy resurfaced:

Q: What were your other impressions of the Soviet Union? Trump: I was very unimpressed. Their system is a disaster. What you will see there soon is a revolution; the signs are all there with the demonstrations and picketing. Russia is out of control and the leadership knows it. That’s my problem with Gorbachev. Not a firm enough hand. Q: You mean firm hand as in China? Trump: When the students poured into Tiananmen Square, the Chinese government almost blew it. Then they were vicious, they were horrible, but they put it down with strength. That shows you the power of strength. Our country is right now perceived as weak … as being spit on by the rest of the world —  Q: Why is Gorbachev not firm enough? Trump: I predict he will be overthrown, because he has shown extraordinary weakness. Suddenly, for the first time ever, there are coal-miner strikes and brush fires everywhere — which will all ultimately lead to a violent revolution. Yet Gorbachev is getting credit for being a wonderful leader and we should continue giving him credit, because he’s destroying the Soviet Union. But his giving an inch is going to end up costing him and all his friends what they most cherish — their jobs.

>>Read more trending stories

So, let’s review:

His “problem with Gorbachev” was that he didn’t put down the protests that ultimately led to the dissolution of the Soviet Union, marking the end of the Cold War. Winning the Cold War is generally considered one of the great American feats of the 20th century — and yet Trump as it was happening thought our country was “perceived as weak … as being spit on by the rest of the world.” And whose example did he deem “stronger”? That of the Chinese government, which killed hundreds if not thousands of its own people to put down similar protests.

That kind of strength, Trump seemed to admire. The kind of actions that could lead to a political leader “costing him and all his friends … their jobs”? Weakness.

Think about that for a moment: The man who would be president of the United States sided with the government that ordered the murder of its own people over a man (Gorbachev) who allowed protests that led to more democracy (even if Russia’s later leadership — including another leader Trump admires, Vladimir Putin — squandered that opportunity).

Just another day living like a lion instead of a sheep, amirite?

David Duke. Benito Mussolini. The killers of Tiananmen Square. These are the figures about whom Trump is ambivalent to admiring. No intellectually honest person can liken this kind of thinking to the GOP or conservative movement more broadly. This is, in terms of American politics, a unique kind of appeal that, as in other ways, is well out of step with mainstream Republicans and conservatives.

It should absolutely be rejected.

Uber changed its logo and a lot of people don't like it

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

Sometimes, change is a good thing. Sometimes, people say it's unnecessary.

>> Read more trending stories  

Yet, many companies change and update their logos in order to stay fresh, hip and desirable to consumers.

Wednesday, Uber, the ultra-popular mobile ride company, changed its logo in an attempt to work in both "the atom" and "the bit." The company also made the change in an effort to use color patterns sourced from countries all around the world.

The company believed its previous logo looked "somewhat distant and cold," believing that it "belied what Uber actually is — a transportation network, woven into the fabric of cities and how they move," according to the company's website.

But social media users aren't supportive of the change. They seem to think Uber's previous design was good enough.

Live Blog: Follow and interact with the GOP debate

This is a recap rundown of the Fox Business Network/WSJ GOP debate. Follow what the candidates said here! Our moderator, Jared Yamamoto is responding to your questions and statements below.

11:16 p.m. Trump wants to make the country better than it’s ever been and notes that he’s self-funding his campaign.

11:15 p.m. Carson focuses on healthcare reform in his closing remarks.

11:14 p.m. Rubio closes with an alternative to the current path America’s heading down. The focus should be families.

11:14 p.m. Cruz reflects on his family’s immigrant history and how he will win using grassroots activism.

11:13 p.m. Bush closes by saying that we need a real Commander-in-Chief and that he'd be that guy.

11:12 p.m. Fiorina closes by attacking Hillary Clinton saying that she can beat Hillary.

11:11 p.m. Kasich closes with a message of hope and responsibility to reconnect with the American Dream and win the 2016 election.

11:10 p.m. Paul starts the closing remarks, claiming that he’s the only fiscal conservative on the stage and we need to get back to those values.

11:07 p.m. Bush looks for a middle ground in the climate change argument.

11:05 p.m. We’re switching to climate change, Paul doesn’t think that humans have a massive impact on the environment.

11:02 p.m. Trump explains what a corporate inversion is and why companies move around to avoid the rising tax rates.

10:59 p.m. Rubio focuses on the future and the way America should be.

10:55 p.m. Fiorina compares Kasich’s argument to Socialism.

10:53 p.m. Kasich attacks Cruz saying his philosophical argument does not help a crisis.

10:51 p.m. Cruz also wants to bring back the gold standard.

10:49 p.m. Cruz wants to eliminate Washington cronyism in both parties.

10:47 p.m. Kasich believes that values need to be utilized in a free market system.

10:44 p.m. Carson thinks we need to focus on cutting banking regulations.

10:41 p.m. Bush claims the Obama administration’s overreach has led to income inequality.

10:35 p.m. Kasich doesn’t consider China as an enemy, but they are not our friends.

10:33 p.m. The conversation has shifted to cyberattacks.

10:32 p.m. Rubio refers to Putin as a global gangster. Rubio thinks he’s very dangerous.

10:30 p.m. Paul thinks Fiorina’s policies would lead to another lengthy war.

10:28 p.m. Fiorina has a different vision to handle Putin and doesn’t agree with Trump.

10:25 p.m. Bush thinks we need to be leaders, but not the police force of the world.

10:23 p.m. Trump attacks the Iranian nuclear deal and is not against Russian President Putin sending troops to fight ISIS in the Middle East.

10:21 p.m. Bush believes American leadership is needed to fix the Middle East.

10:18 p.m. Carson answers the first question out of the break on adding special operations forces throughout the Middle East. He thinks the current state is ineffective and we need to “make them look like losers.”

10:12 p.m. Paul is getting more airtime this time around. He continues promoting fiscal conservatism.

10:08 p.m. Cruz jumps in saying there is a middle ground between the two arguments.

10:07 p.m. Paul’s attack continues. Rubio thinks we need to focus on spending more on the military.

10:04 p.m. Paul attacks Rubio’s tax plan, questioning his conservatism.

10:02 p.m. Rubio enforces family values in his tax code. He says the family is the core of the American economy.  

9:59 p.m. Bush also thinks the tax code should be simplified. He says 2% economic growth isn’t good.

9:57 p.m. Cruz is the second candidate to plug his website. He focuses on his tax plan.

9:55 p.m. Paul says, "I want a government really really small, so small you can barely see it."

9:54 p.m. Paul would make a tax plan with zero deductions on businesses.

9:52 p.m. Carson explains his tax plan. He thinks it needs to be the same percentage across the board no matter how much you make.

9:47 p.m. Fiorina thinks the ‘free market’ is the best alternative to fix Obamacare.

9:45 pm. The conversation has changed to Obamacare. Fiorina wants it repealed and thinks it prohibits businesses from succeeding.  

9:42 p.m. Cruz attacks the media again for misinterpreting his campaign pledges.

9:40 p.m. Rubio focuses on American business tax rates. He believes they are too high and need to be lowered.

9:37 p.m. Trump says, "If you think walls don't work, all you have to do is ask Israel."

9:36 p.m. The moderators are losing control after Trump’s response to Kasich. Several candidates are trying to chime in.

9:35 p.m. Kasich disagrees with Trump’s analysis. He doesn’t envision moving 15 million immigrants.

9:33 p.m. Trump turns the conversation to immigration reform and reaffirms that a wall will work on the U.S.-Mexican border.

9:30 p.m. Ben Carson responds to his controversial statements made last week. He turns the conversation into a attack on Hillary Clinton.

9:24 p.m. Sen. Rand Paul opens by attacking the U.S. Federal Reserve. He thinks that rising interest rates are not helping the middle class.

9:21 p.m. Carly Fiorina opens by attacking the size and scope of the ever growing U.S. Government.

9:20 p.m. Gov. Bush wants to focus on small businesses and suggests the economy is not as well as we think.

9:18 p.m. Gov. Jeb Bush is frustrated with Gov. Kasich for taking his opening time.

9:16 p.m. Sen. Ted Cruz opens with a vision of growing the economy.

9:13 p.m. Gov. John Kasich is first to promote his presidential website. He’s seeking ‘middle class’ reform.

9:10 p.m. Sen. Marco Rubio is also against raising the minimum wage. “It only accelerates automated processes.”

9:08 p.m. Ben Carson and Donald Trump respond to raising the minimum wage. Both do not want to see it raised.

9:03 p.m. The candidates and rules are being introduced. Here we go.

Kaedy's Conversations - David Coverdale

Kaedy Kiely interviewed David Coverdale of Whitesnake back in 2000 - listen to part one.

She asked about Coverdale’s relationship with the surviving members of Led Zeppelin, since he had worked with Jimmy Page on the Coverdale/Page project.(listen)

 

 

After recording two solo albums, former Deep Purple vocalist David Coverdale formed Whitesnake around 1977. In the glut of hard rock and heavy metal bands of the late '70s, their first albums got somewhat lost in the shuffle, although they were fairly popular in Europe and Japan. During 1982, Coverdale took some time off so he could take care of his sick daughter. When he re-emerged with a new version of Whitesnake in 1984, the band sounded revitalized and energetic. Slide It In may have relied on Led Zeppelin's and Deep Purple's old tricks, but the band had a knack for writing hooks; the record became their first platinum album. Three years later, Whitesnake released an eponymous album (titled 1987 in Europe) that was even better. Portions of the album were blatantly derivative -- "Still of the Night" was a dead ringer for early Zeppelin -- but the group could write powerful, heavy rockers like "Here I Go Again" that were driven as much by melody as riffs, as well as hit power ballads like "Is This Love."Whitesnake was an enormous international success, selling over six million copies in the U.S. alone.

Before they recorded their follow-up, 1989's Slip of the Tongue, Coverdale again assembled a completely new version of the band, featuring guitar virtuoso Steve Vai. Although the record went platinum, it was a considerable disappointment after the across-the-board success of Whitesnake. Coverdale put Whitesnake on hiatus after that album. In 1993, he released a collaboration with former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page that was surprisingly lackluster. The following year, Whitesnake issued a greatest-hits album in the U.S. and Canada focusing solely on material from their final three albums (as well as containing a few unreleased tracks).

In 1997, Coverdale resurrected Whitesnake (guitarist Adrian Vandenberg was the only remaining member of the group's latter-day lineup), issuing Restless Heart the same year. Surprisingly, the album wasn't even issued in the United States. On the ensuing tour, Coverdale and Vandenberg performed an "unplugged" show in Japan that was recorded and issued the following year under the title Starkers in Tokyo. By the late '90s, however, Coverdale once again put Whitesnake on hold, as he concentrated on recording his first solo album in nearly 22 years. Coverdale's Into the Light was issued in September 2000, featuring journeyman guitarist Earl Slick. After a lengthy hiatus that saw the release of countless "greatest-hits" and "live" collections, the band returned in 2008 with the impressive Good to Be Bad. Coverdale and Whitesnake toured the album throughout Europe and Japan. The band returned to the recording studio in 2010 with new members bassist Michael Devin (formerly of Lynch Mob) and drummer Brian Tichy, who appeared alongside guitarists Doug Aldrich and Reb Beach, and guest keyboardist Timothy Drury (as well as Coverdale's son Jasper on backing vocals on various tracks). The band's 11th album, Forevermore, was preceded by the issue of the single, "Love Will Set You Free," and released in the spring of 2011. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Greg Prato, Rovi

Kaedy Kiely

Kaedy Kiely has been playing some of the classics since they were new, and you can hear her every weekday morning between 5:30am and 8:30am on 97.1 The River.

Thank you to those of you who have posted on this welcome page or called me to welcome me back to the airwaves. I couldn't be happier than to be with you on The River. It's the music I love in the city I love with the best listeners in the world! I always want to hear from you - please feel free to comment, ask questions, or just keep in touch by emailing me directly here

Thanks for listening, and I appreciate you taking the time to let me know what you think.

The River Guy

Hey River Crew – My name is Clapper (yes – real name) I am the Director of Marketing and Promotions for Atlanta's Only Classic Hits Station. You can find me on the streets with The River whether it's at one of the many great rock shows in Atlanta on at one of our great events. What a treat it's been building this station from scratch. I have a deep passion for a lot of the music we play, just like the passion that most listeners have for The River. My Top Five FAVORITE River Artists 1) Led Zeppelin 2) Rolling Stones 3) Steely Dan 4) Tom Petty 5) Pink Floyd Here are my Top Five River Albums 1) Bob Seger - Live Bullet 2) Led Zeppelin - In Through The Out Door 3) Rolling Stones - Sticky Fingers 4) Pink Floyd - Dark Side of The Moon 5) Aerosmith - Toys In The Attic I have been in the music business for over a 17 years with stints in: Detroit (WCSX- Rock City) Memphis (WMFS- Home of The Blues and the Birthplace of Rock and Roll) Birmingham Alabama as well as working for MCA Records. Didn't Lynyrd Skynyrd sing about that? Working for the MCA! Atlanta has been home for 10 years and I love it. I have also had the pleasure to work in Traverse City Michigan (WKLT) It's one of the most beautiful places on earth.....Check it out someday if you ever get up to Northern Michigan

9 items
Results 1 - 9 of 9