Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

lifestyles

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >

Tips to keep your dog cool in the summer

Humans have been known to put pets in danger in the heat.

With some cities hitting triple-digit temperatures, it’s important to remember to keep our dogs and other pets safe during the warm summer months. 

Safety first

It’s already too hot to leave dogs in a parked car for any length of time without air conditioning. Even in the shade, cars heat up fast, and cracking the windows does not help much.

EMS in Travis County, Texas, recommend checking to see if your pet can go inside your destination before you leave home, and leaving your dog at home if not.

Cars aren’t the only danger during the sizzling season. Here are more hot weather pet tips from Travis County and PETA:

  • Keep dogs inside. They can’t sweat like humans and they’re wearing fur coats. Panting is their main way to release heat, and that won’t be enough when it’s really hot, especially if they’re forced to move around.
  • Don’t over-exercise your dog in high temperatures. Keep outdoor activity to dawn and dusk as much as possible, not the heat of the day. Carry water for you and your dog, and look for routes with water access, so your dog has a place to get wet and cool off (make sure dogs are allowed).
  • If you usually run with your dog, how about walking instead? Dogs want to please and can push themselves past the point of risking their own safety just to keep up. If your dog collapses in the heat, it might be too late.
  • Avoid hot pavement. A general rule: If the surface is too hot for your bare foot, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws. If you have to cross asphalt or another hot surface, keep your dog moving (don’t stand). Walk in grass as much as possible.
  • Don’t put your dog in the bed of a pickup truck. A sudden stop could throw your dog from the truck, or your dog could strangle itself if she’s tethered to the truck and jumps out.
  • Provide plenty of water and shade for pets when they are outside, and do the same for outdoor animals as well. Account for shifting sun patterns.

Know the signs

Do you know when your dog is getting dangerously overheated? A lot of people don’t. The City of Austin, Texas, posted signs on the hike-and-bike trail a few summers ago urging other people to alert owners when their dogs appeared to be getting too hot.

Here are more signs to look out for, according to trainers at the Canine Center for Training and Behavior:

  • Heavy panting, breathing or drooling, and restlessness.
  • A large tongue that appears to “bell out” at the end.
  • Dry or discolored gums (not easy to spot if your dog has darker gums).
  • A racing or erratic pulse.
  • If your dog is “dancing” on a surface, he might be trying to keep his feet cool.

Cool tools

A quick inquiry to dog-loving folks on Facebook and an online search turns up more than a dozen products designed to help keep your dog cool when the temperature rises.

The following are a few tools that can be used before, during or after outdoor activities (most available online and in stores). Remember: None of these tools replaces common sense and care in the heat. 

  • Around the neck: Wet and freeze a bandanna for a simple cooling tool. Two products you can buy (among others): The KoolCollar, a hollow collar filled with a cooling gel tube for indoor use (less messy), or ice cubes for outside ($18 to $20; www.koolcollar4dogs.com). The Chill Collar is a similar product; it's filled with a gel, and you freeze the whole thing before use ($39.95; www.inthecompanyofdogs.com). 
  • Around the body: Swamp coolers and similar products wrap around a dog's midsection for a whole-body cooldown. The Ruffwear version of a swamp cooler uses evaporative cooling to draw out body heat. Soak the vest-like product in cold water and wring it out before putting it on your dog. You can pour more water directly on the vest while your dog is wearing it, too ($59.95; www.ruffwear.com). The Kool Koat, which is made of shammy material that Velcros around the middle, works like a swamp cooler. It can help keep dogs’ rear ends and and bellies cool in the summer. ($20 to $85; www.pettemp.com
  • Lounging: Pads such as the K9 Cooling Mat and the Cool Bed Lounger (various styles and prices) provide a cool surface for your dog to recline upon. Another version is the Canine Cooler Therapeutic Pad, which is designed to ease inflammation and joint pain in dogs through a water-filled pad, but could be used for heat relief, too. For instant shade, you can pop up the Portable Pet Shade, a pop-up tent that folds up to fit in a carrying case (all at www.inthecompanyofdogs.com).

Read more at Austin360.com.

Do low-calorie sugar substitutes, artificial sweeteners help you lose weight?

Of the 41 percent of American adults and 25 percent of U.S. children who consume artificial sweeteners, most consume them at least once a day, according to a study published earlier this year.

» RELATED: These 9 healthy-sounding foods have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut 

And the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has said artificial sweeteners can be used to manage weight or blood sugar by limiting energy intake.

But if you’re looking for a sweet secret solution to your weight loss woes, new research warns against falling into the growing trap of artificial sweeteners or low-calorie sugar substitutes for weight management.

>> Read more trending news

In fact, according to the new study, published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), artificial sweeteners (like stevia, aspartame or sucralose) may actually lead to heart disease, higher risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and long-term weight gain.

» RELATED: Exercising to lose weight? Skip these popular workouts 

To determine whether or not artificial sweeteners are associated with the negative long-term effects previous studies have cited, researchers from the University of Manitoba’s George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation examined more than 11,000 studies on both artificial and natural sweeteners, performed a meta-analysis of 37 studies and then divided them into randomized controlled trials (seven) and longitudinal studies (30).

» RELATED: Are artificial sweeteners safe (and how much can you have)? 

In total, scientists followed more than 400,000 people for an average of 10 years, with seven of those studies (the randomized controlled trials) involving 1,003 people for an average of six months.

Here’s what the researchers found:

  • In the short seven randomized control trials of 1,003 people, those who consumed artificial sweeteners did not lose or gain more weight or see a decrease in body mass index (BMI) or in waist circumference than the controls in that group.
  • The 30 longer, observational studies showed people who consumed those low-calorie sweeteners were actually more likely to face increased risk of type 2 diabetes (14 percent), obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and other related cardiovascular issues (32 percent higher risk for the heaviest participants compared to the lightest).
  • The longer observational studies also pointed toward an increase in BMI and waist circumference due to consumption of artificial sweeteners.

» RELATED: New study on Splenda's link to cancer sparks controversy 

“Despite the fact that millions of individuals routinely consume artificial sweeteners, relatively few patients have been included in clinical trials of these products. We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management,” Ryan Zarychanski, assistant professor at University of Manitoba and author of the study, said.

But there are some limitations to the study. For example, the way people consumed artificial sweeteners in the clinical trials may not exactly mimic how people would actually consume them.

» RELATED: Scientists say eating cheese can help weight loss 

Most of those involved in the randomized trials were on a weight-loss program, but the larger population consuming low-calorie sweeteners may not be doing so to lose weight.

It’s important to remember the study’s findings are associations, not cause and effect.

But lead author Meghan Azad, who is also an assistant professor, cautioned against the consumption of artificial sweeteners until more research is done to identify long-term health effects.

Azad and her colleagues are currently researching how such sweeteners consumed by pregnant women may impact their baby’s weight, metabolism and gut bacteria, according to Medical News Today.

In the meantime, instead of using artificial sweeteners as a healthy substitute for sugar, try to decrease your sweet tooth altogether by consuming fruit-infused water, black coffee or plain yogurt with fruit, Azad told NPR.

Read the full study at CMAJ.ca. 

Police officer helps woman, daughter left homeless over medical bills

A woman is thanking a police officer for helping her when a health emergency left her homeless.

>> Watch the news report here

Jennifer More and her mother, Barbara, were recently begging on a Los Angeles street corner when someone called the cops on them.

A fall recently left Barbara with brain damage. Her medical bills were so expensive, she and her daughter were left with nothing, leading to homelessness.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Los Angeles Police Department Senior Lead Officer Sean Dinse responded to the call in a surprising way.

“He told us he understood our predicament and he would like to help,” Jennifer told KCBS.

>> Read more trending news

Dinse posted their story to their story to Facebook, and soon members of the community came together to help the women get back on their feet.

A business owner paid for a motel for a few nights for the women.

The LAPD is now collecting gift cards for Jennifer and Barbara.

Baby who was 'close to death' from blood disease saved by anonymous bone marrow donor

Baby Denniya Rawls was born with a potentially deadly genetic blood disease known as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or HLH, and was admitted to Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital in March where doctors described her as “close to death.”

>> Watch the news report here

“She was really almost in liver failure and could not breathe well,” Dr. Rabi Hanna, the department chairman of Pediatrics Hematology Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, told WKYC.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Robin Thornton, Denniya’s mother, said the disease was eating up her immune system and that her body was fighting against itself.

However, a bone marrow transplant from an anonymous 54-year-old saved the little girl’s life. After spending 100 days in the hospital, now 8-month-old Denniya is home on Cleveland’s east side. To date, she is the youngest baby to get a lifesaving bone marrow transplant at the hospital.

>> Read more trending news

“Bless his heart, wherever he is,” her parents said. “We can’t wait to meet him because this is our miracle baby right here!”

Thornton added, “To hear her breathe. To hear her laugh. To see her smile.”

Strangers help man with Down syndrome rebuild movie collection lost in wildfire

A man with Down syndrome is thanking strangers around the country for helping him rebuild his prized movie collectionafter a wildfire destroyed his home.

Mark Orsillo, 34, was devastated when a a raging wildfire engulfed his family’s Oroville, California, home earlier this month. The family lost everything, including Mark’s collection of 400 DVDs.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

“He has all the movies from the ’90s. He’s been collecting them for years,” Mark’s sister, Danielle Devine, told CBS News. “That’s Mark’s life. He’s a movie guy.”

Danielle took to Facebook to ask for help. She asked her friends for help rebuilding Mark’s collection.

>> Read more trending news

“He is an OCD movie collector and lost hundreds of movies. He spends most of his free time watching, organizing and talking about his movies,” wrote Danielle.

Within just a few days, strangers from around the country donated about 400 movies to Mark.

“Thank you so so so so much for the outpouring of love. My family can’t put into words how grateful we are,” wrote Danielle on Facebook.

>> See the post here

UPS driver adopts pit bull on her route after owner dies

Katie Newhouser is a local UPS driver in Rancho Cucamonga, California, who had a special bond with a pit bull on her route named Leo.

“He would hear my truck come into the condo complex and start barking and scratching at the door to come down to the truck,” Newhouser told PupJournal. “He would love to come into the truck and go into the back to look around.”

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

In October 2016, Newhouser learned through Facebook that Leo’s owner, Tina, had died. Her son was unable to take the dog in because he is in the Marines, so Newhouser offered to foster the dog. She already had three other dogs, though, and didn’t intend on keeping Leo.

However, her personal bond with Leo proved too strong to adopt him out to someone else, so Newhouser ended up keeping him.

>> See the Facebook post here

“The whole vibe in the house changed as soon as we brought him home,” she said. “He is the biggest, most lovable dog that you will ever meet. He was instantly running around the yard with my dogs.”

There were some adjustments for Leo, the biggest of which was living life without Tina.

>> Read more trending news

“I do know that Leo missed Tina when he first got here,” Newhouser said. “He would whine at night before he would fall asleep. It was heartbreaking, really. He still does every once in a while. I know he misses her.”

Despite missing Tina, Leo loves playing and lying in the yard with Newhouser’s other dogs and has a new family who will always love him.

Soldier who saluted stranger's funeral procession in viral photo responds to unexpected attention

A photo of Tennessee National Guard Col. Jack Usrey standing beside his car in the pouring rain to salute a funeral procession is going viral.

>> Watch the news report here

But Usrey doesn’t think anything of it. He says that’s how he was raised, telling WTVF: “Maybe I can make them feel better. ... I’m just an average soldier, but I was raised that way. We always stopped; my mom and dad taught me to do that.”

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Usrey works at the Tennessee National Guard headquarters in Knoxville, Tennessee. The photo was captured in Vine Grove, Kentucky, near Fort Knox; it was taken by Instagram user Erin Hester earlier this month and promptly went viral.

>> See the photo here

“I was so completely touched by this today,” she wrote. “I feel pretty confident there isn’t a military rule that soldiers have to do this. This made my heart happy to see the amount of respect that this gentleman showed a family that he doesn’t even know.”

>> Read more trending news

She tagged the photo #values and #respect.

Usrey is one of many in his family to have served, reports WSMV. His father and brother served in the Navy, with his brother advancing to the rank of lieutenant colonel. One of Usrey’s sons serves in the Navy now, and another is a student at The Citadel.

Woman shot at gender reveal party not actually pregnant, police say

A woman did not lose her unborn child during a shooting at a gender reveal party because she wasn't pregnant, police said. 

>> Read more trending news 

Cheyanne Willis threw a gender reveal party, but was not pregnant, Ohio police told WCPO-TV

On July 8, Willis and others gathered at an Ohio home where she was going to announce the gender of her baby. Police said they believe two gunmen entered through the front door and fired 14 rounds while attendants were watching a movie, WCPO-TV reported. 

One person was killed and another eight injured, including three children. A dog was also injured. 

"From the very beginning of this investigation, we have met significant resistance that is uncommon from victims of crime wanting a resolution," a news release from police Chief Mark Denney said.

Willis told WCPO-TV that she lost her pregnancy after she was shot in the leg. 

Denney said he wasn't trying to embarrass anyone by revealing the fake pregnancy, but wanted to illustrate the difficulties the police department has been facing. 

"The Colerain Police Department will not comment further on any other misleading information, other than to say we wish our time had been spent on true leads that would help us remove these dangerous criminals from the streets," Denney said.

So far, no one has been arrested. 

Doctors remove 27 contact lenses from woman’s eye before cataract surgery 

A routine cataract surgery was abruptly halted when doctors found 17 contact lenses in a British woman’s eye, according to news reports. After finding the first clump, which they described as a “blueish mass,” they found 10 more. 

>> Read more trending news 

The 67-year-old woman from the United Kingdom had not complained of any irritation, just the normal discomfort of dry eye she thought was from old age, Optometry Today reported.

"She was quite shocked," ophthalmologist Rupal Morjaria told Optometry Today.

“It was such a large mass. All the 17 contact lenses were stuck together. We were really surprised that the patient didn’t notice it because it would cause quite a lot of irritation while it was sitting there,” Morjaria added.

Morjaria said the woman, who had been wearing monthly disposable contact lenses for approximately 35 years, according to NPR, felt a lot more comfortable during her two-week follow up after having the 27 contacts removed.

» Woman sues for $1M, claiming flea market contacts left her blind

The doctors said they wanted to publicize her case as a warning to others who wear contacts. Tips and advice are available at the Association of Optometrists.

Read more at Optometry Today.

» Headed to the eye doctor? You have a right to your prescription

OK to curse in front of your kids? Facebook post sparks debate

A woman in Australia is making the case for cursing in front of children.

>> Read more trending news 

Constance Hall, an Australian blogger and mom, shared her theories in a Facebook post that went viral, and the “Today” Show further added to the discussion.

>> Woman receives death threats after sharing photo of her baby’s ‘pierced’ cheek

In the post, Hall points out that she has let some reactionary swear words slip while in the presence of her children, but she feels the cursing isn’t a big issue. Hall said she doesn’t need to teach her children they can’t use swear words, and that they instinctively know it isn’t allowed.

“But my kids have never sworn. They know mum can, we can't,” Hall wrote in the post.

She added that one of her children has begun to curse, but she believes it was influenced by friends, not her.

A “Today” show poll on Twitter found that 67 percent of 3,252 voters do not agree with Hall. But the show’s child development expert, Dr. Deborah Gilboa, backs up her claims.

>> 'Teen Mom' star Farrah Abraham slammed for a picture of daughter drinking weight loss tea

"The rule here is: You can swear. But you can't swear where an adult or a child younger than you can hear," Gilboa said. "Treating people respectfully matters, so if they feel swearing around them is disrespectful, don't do it."

WARNING: Facebook post contains raw language not safe for the workplace.

Read an edited excerpt from the post below.

“I ... sometimes swear in front of my kids. I justify it to myself be saying I only ever swear for emphasis, I never swear at anyone.

“You'll never catch me calling someone a name or screaming (expletive.)

“It's the (expletive) when you you've gotten everyone in the car and are pulling out of the drive way when you smell a baby decided now was the perfect time to drop a (expletive).

“Or the (expletive) at the pain that an innocent babies soft little lips can shoot through your body when latching onto (you.) 

“But my kids have never sworn. They know mum can, we can't.

“I barely even needed to teach them that, it was instinctual. Adult words and they rarely repeated them despite the odd hilarious moment in the supermarket..

“But recently, to my surprise Arlo has been dropping a few bombs..

“And as it turns out, his new mates don't mind throwing around these particular words and their all rocking out feeling cool (because) they said (an expletive.)

“Does it bother me? Not much, meanness would bother me more. I certainly don't encourage it, have pulled him up on it and he appears to have stopped.

“But I realized something pretty important. Arlo is reaching an age where his friends have a greater influence on him then I do, he copies them, loves them dearly and gets empowered by them.

“I read about that once, about how you will come to a time where your children get their power from their mates and there isn't much you can do about it, you need to let them discover who they are in a group of peers. That's socializing.

“And it's beautiful.

“But what we can do is teach them how to recognize qualities that we respect. Point out, ‘How kind was Charley lending you his drink bottle?’ And ‘did you see how Sam helped out that younger kid?"’“’I love the way Sophia is always making funny jokes.’

“So while it's important to say, ‘Don't swear. It's not cool,’ it’s equally important to teach your kids to strive to find friends with similar moral codes to your family.

“That way when they do ignore you and run off with their mates, they are in good hands, maybe cheeky ones, maybe sweary ones, but good ones none the less.

“Because our house hold might be a sweary one, but it's a ... kind one, and it’s full to the brim with love.”

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >