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Listen to Metallica's New Song, 'Moth Into Flame'

Metallica are offering a free preview of "Moth Into Flame" from the group's upcoming 'Hardwired ... to Self-Destruct.' Continue reading…

James Hetfield Knows Why Metallica Haven't Performed at the Super Bowl

Many of the biggest musical acts in the world have performed during the Super Bowl halftime show. Metallica aren't on the list.

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Jimi Hendrix, 'Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69′: Album Review

Jimi Hendrix didn't waste much time pulling together a new trio after the Experience broke up in June 1969.

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Joe Perry's New Solo Record Is 'In the Can'

You won't hear it in 2016, but Joe Perry appears to be just about finished with his next solo album.

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Jimi Hendrix, 'Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69′: Album Review

Jimi Hendrix didn't waste much time pulling together a new trio after the Experience broke up in June 1969.

Continue reading…

New Orleans' Big Freedia introduces Beyoncé at Superdome

In royal fashion, New Orleans' own Queen of Bounce brought out Houston's own Queen Bey at the Superdome.

Big Freedia tells NOLA.com ' The Times-Picayune (http://bit.ly/2d1jeSo ) that she was asked to go onstage shortly before the start of Saturday's night's concert.

In her words, "Well, they're very secretive about everything so I got the call at the last minute."

She wore the black Victorian-style costume that Beyoncé's dancers wore for "Formation." She told the audience, "Slay! Slay! Slay! Are you ready, New Orleans? The one and only!"

After leaving the Superdome early Sunday, Big Freedia told the newspaper that just before she went onstage, Beyoncé kissed her hand. She said, in her words, "I just died on the steps."

Country singer Jean Shepard dies; was Grand Ole Opry staple

Jean Shepard, "the grand lady of the Grand Ole Opry" who had a long recording career as an influential female in country music, died Sunday, according to an Opry spokeswoman. Shepard was 82.

Spokeswoman Jessie Schmidt said in a news release that Shepard had entered hospice care last week and died in Nashville.

"The Opry family is truly saddened by the news of Jean's passing," Opry vice president and general manager Pete Fisher said in the statement. "Although we will miss Jean's presence on the Opry stage, she has left us the wonderful gift of her music which will be remembered for generations to come."

Shepard joined the cast of the Grand Ole Opry in 1955 and helped set the standard for women in country music, choosing to tour as a solo act rather than as part of a group. She presented a strong female point of view on songs like "Twice the Lovin' in Half the Time" and "The Root of All Evil (Is a Man)," influencing such key figures in country music as Loretta Lynn who came along a decade later.

Shepard also was credited with releasing country music's first concept album, "Songs From a Love Affair," in 1956.

Shepard was born in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, and was one of 10 children. She was raised near Bakersfield, California, where she listened to the Grand Ole Opry, the show she later performed on.

Her career began in the 1940s. According to the Grand Ole Opry website, Western swing musician Hank Thompson saw her at age 14, singing and playing bass in the Melody Ranch Girls, an all-girl band, and helped her begin recording.

She paired with fellow Hall of Fame member Ferlin Husky in 1953 on "A Dear John Letter," her first No. 1 country hit.

In 1963, her husband at the time, country singer Hawkshaw Hawkins, was killed in a plane crash along with Patsy Cline and Cowboy Copas.

In 2005, she became the first female singer to reach 50 years as a Grand Ole Opry member, according to the Opry's website.

Shepard was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011 as she continued to perform regularly on the Grand Ole Opry.

Shepard is survived by her husband, Benny Birchfield, and sons Don Robin Hawkins, Harold Franklin Hawkins II and Corey Birchfield.

Funeral arrangements were incomplete.

Funeral arrangements made for the late rapper Shawty Lo

Funeral arrangements have been announced for rapper Shawty Lo who was killed in a fiery car crash on a freeway near southwest Atlanta.

Lo's manager Johnnie Cabbell tells local news media that the rapper's funeral will be held Oct. 1 at Jackson Memorial Baptist Church. Police say the 40-year-old rapper, whose real name is Carlos Walker, was ejected from a 2016 Audi when the vehicle struck a couple of trees, overturned and burst into flames early Wednesday.

Passengers Destini Carter and Deshondria Miller escaped the wreckage. Both were taken to Grady Memorial Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

In 2008, Shawty Lo was named MySpace Music Rookie of the Year at the BET Hip-Hop Awards. That year, his hit "Dey Know" was among the most-played rap songs on radio stations nationwide.

Country singer Jean Shepard dies; was Grand Ole Opry staple

Jean Shepard, "the grand lady of the Grand Ole Opry" who had a long recording career as an influential female in country music, died Sunday, according to an Opry spokeswoman. Shepard was 82.

Spokeswoman Jessie Schmidt said in a news release that Shepard had entered hospice care last week and died in Nashville.

"The Opry family is truly saddened by the news of Jean's passing," Opry vice president and general manager Pete Fisher said in the statement. "Although we will miss Jean's presence on the Opry stage, she has left us the wonderful gift of her music which will be remembered for generations to come."

Shepard joined the cast of the Grand Ole Opry in 1955 and helped set the standard for women in country music, choosing to tour as a solo act rather than as part of a group. She presented a strong female point of view on songs like "Twice the Lovin' in Half the Time" and "The Root of All Evil (Is a Man)," influencing such key figures in country music as Loretta Lynn who came along a decade later.

Shepard also was credited with releasing country music's first concept album, "Songs From a Love Affair," in 1956.

Shepard was born in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, and was one of 10 children. She was raised near Bakersfield, California, where she listened to the Grand Ole Opry, the show she later performed on.

Her career began in the 1940s. According to the Grand Ole Opry website, Western swing musician Hank Thompson saw her at age 14, singing and playing bass in the Melody Ranch Girls, an all-girl band, and helped her begin recording.

She paired with fellow Hall of Fame member Ferlin Husky in 1953 on "A Dear John Letter," her first No. 1 country hit.

In 1963, her husband at the time, country singer Hawkshaw Hawkins, was killed in a plane crash along with Patsy Cline and Cowboy Copas.

In 2005, she became the first female singer to reach 50 years as a Grand Ole Opry member, according to the Opry's website.

Shepard was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011 as she continued to perform regularly on the Grand Ole Opry.

Shepard is survived by her husband, Benny Birchfield, and sons Don Robin Hawkins, Harold Franklin Hawkins II and Corey Birchfield.

Funeral arrangements were incomplete.

Still no will, but work to settle Prince estate forges ahead

Work to settle Prince's estate is moving forward, and a closed hearing is expected to be held this week to resolve an undisclosed dispute between the likely heirs and the trust company that's managing the estate. Court papers say only that the dispute involves "confidential business agreements." Five months after the musician's death, here's a look at where things stand:

STILL NO WILL

No will has surfaced since Prince died of an accidental painkiller overdose in April, so his sister, Tyka Nelson, and five half-siblings are likely to be declared the rightful heirs within the next few months. Carver County District Judge Kevin Eide has not made an official declaration or said when he will. He has rejected numerous claims by people who said they were Prince's children, wives and cousins, or that they otherwise deserved a piece his estate. The main question remaining is whether a woman and girl who claim to be Prince's niece and grandniece are entitled to shares. The judge plans to hold one or two hearings on that in November.

WHO IS RUNNING THE SHOW?

At Tyka Nelson's request, the court appointed Bremer Trust to serve as special administrator of the estate pending the appointment of an executor, which would happen after the court names the legal heirs. Tyka Nelson or someone else could be named the executor, or the heirs could choose to keep Bremer Trust in charge or bring in a different manager. Currently, Prince's entertainment assets are being managed by L. Londell McMillan, a longtime attorney, manager and friend of the artist, and entertainment industry executive Charles Koppelman.

CLAIMS DEADLINE

A Sept. 12 deadline set by the judge for claims against the estate passed quietly. Most businesses that say they're owed money have been filing their claims directly with Bremer Trust, and those claims aren't public information. While people who claim to be Prince's heirs are supposed to have filed with the court by now, it's possible that more claims could trickle in. But the legal bar for getting taken seriously at this point is high.

THE CONCERT

The Oct. 13 tribute concert sanctioned by Prince's family sold out quickly when tickets went on sale Monday. The lineup includes Stevie Wonder, Christina Aguilera, Chaka Khan and others. Prince's inner circle gets a nod with Morris Day & The Time, Judith Hill and Liv Warfield, The New Power Generation and 3rd Eye Girl. The family originally wanted to hold the concert at the new NFL stadium in Minneapolis, but after a long wait for details that frustrated fans across the country, the much smaller Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul was chosen as the venue.

THE PAISLEY PARK MUSEUM

Paisley Park, the 65,000-square-foot studio complex in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen where Prince lived and died, opens for tours Oct. 6. If that sounds reminiscent of Elvis Presley's Graceland, it should. Graceland Holdings is managing it. The tours will include the studios where Prince recorded, produced and mixed most of his biggest hits; the soundstage where he rehearsed for tours and hosted exclusive private concerts; and displays of artifacts including costumes, awards, instruments, and rare music and video recordings. The 70-minute tour costs $46 to $57.50, while the 100-minute VIP tour will cost $111.75. Tickets are available online only. A round building on the 9-acre grounds may be developed into a boutique hotel eventually.

THE TAXMAN COMETH

No official valuation of the estate has surfaced since a Bremer Trust attorney estimated during a hearing in June that it could be worth $100 million to $300 million. But it's certain that attorneys, accountants and others are hard at work on that question. That's because estate taxes are expected to gobble up just over half its value. The Internal Revenue Service will be expecting a payment in January. Bremer Trust has been putting some of Prince's real estate holdings on the market. His recorded music shot to the top of the charts after he died, so it's a safe bet that a lot of those royalties will find their way into the public treasury.

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