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British songwriter accuses U2 of stealing song

A British songwriter and guitarist is claiming that rock band U2 and lead singer Bono stole one of his songs for their 1991 album "Achtung Baby."

In a lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan federal court, Paul Rose says U2 lifted elements of his song "Nae Slappin" for their song "The Fly" while they were looking for new inspiration.

The lawsuit says U2 heard his song after signing on with Island Records in 1989, the same year Rose provided a demo tape to recording studio executives.

Rose is seeking songwriting credit for "The Fly" and $5 million in damages and lawyer's fees.

The New York Post reports representatives for U2 and Island Records did not immediately return requests for comment.

British songwriter accuses U2 of stealing song

A British songwriter and guitarist is claiming that rock band U2 and lead singer Bono stole one of his songs for their 1991 album "Achtung Baby."

In a lawsuit filed Monday in Manhattan federal court, Paul Rose says U2 lifted elements of his song "Nae Slappin" for their song "The Fly" while they were looking for new inspiration.

The lawsuit says U2 heard his song after signing on with Island Records in 1989, the same year Rose provided a demo tape to recording studio executives.

Rose is seeking songwriting credit for "The Fly" and $5 million in damages and lawyer's fees.

The New York Post reports representatives for U2 and Island Records did not immediately return requests for comment.

The Latest: Accounting firm takes blame for Oscars flub

The Latest on the fallout from the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Academy Awards (all times local):

6:40 p.m.

The accounting firm responsible for correctly tallying Academy Award winners says its team didn't move quickly enough to correct the incorrect announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Oscars.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, says in a statement released Monday night that it accepts full responsibility for "the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols."

The firm says partner Brian Cullinan mistakenly handed an envelope with the best actress winner to Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, who were presenting the best picture honor. PwC says Cullinan and another partner responsible for the integrity of the winners did not correct the mistake quickly enough.

The statement apologizes to the cast of "La La Land," which was mistakenly announced as the winner before the correct winner, "Moonlight," was announced.

___

4:50 p.m.

Moments before he handed out the wrong envelope in one of the worst gaffes in Oscar history, PwC accountant Brian Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read.

It's one potential clue in the whodunit that Sunday's ceremony became after presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty mistakenly proclaimed "La La Land" as the best-picture winner instead of "Moonlight."

Cullinan was one of two accountants for PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, tasked with doling out the envelopes containing winners' names to the presenters. But the envelope that Cullinan gave to Dunaway and Beatty was a duplicate of the previously announced win for Stone, not for best picture.

PwC declined comment Monday about Cullinan's social-media use may have distracted him.

The Latest: Accounting firm takes blame for Oscars flub

The Latest on the fallout from the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Academy Awards (all times local):

6:40 p.m.

The accounting firm responsible for correctly tallying Academy Award winners says its team didn't move quickly enough to correct the incorrect announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Oscars.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, says in a statement released Monday night that it accepts full responsibility for "the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols."

The firm says partner Brian Cullinan mistakenly handed an envelope with the best actress winner to Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, who were presenting the best picture honor. PwC says Cullinan and another partner responsible for the integrity of the winners did not correct the mistake quickly enough.

The statement apologizes to the cast of "La La Land," which was mistakenly announced as the winner before the correct winner, "Moonlight," was announced.

___

4:50 p.m.

Moments before he handed out the wrong envelope in one of the worst gaffes in Oscar history, PwC accountant Brian Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read.

It's one potential clue in the whodunit that Sunday's ceremony became after presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty mistakenly proclaimed "La La Land" as the best-picture winner instead of "Moonlight."

Cullinan was one of two accountants for PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, tasked with doling out the envelopes containing winners' names to the presenters. But the envelope that Cullinan gave to Dunaway and Beatty was a duplicate of the previously announced win for Stone, not for best picture.

PwC declined comment Monday about Cullinan's social-media use may have distracted him.

Miami's Liberty City neighborhood shares 'Moonlight' success

Far from the sun and glamour of South Beach or the artists and hipsters of Wynwood, "Moonlight" presents a view of Miami that never shows up in a tourism video. It shows predominantly black communities, truly known by few outside the people who live there.

And it's recognizably their Miami, made beautiful and suddenly more hopeful than it might have seemed before.

"The best thing about this movie is they actually went into the projects and shot it, and they let kids from around Liberty City be in it," said Kamal Ani-Bello, a freshman at Miami Northwestern Senior High School who had a role as an extra in the film. "Usually people make 'hoods on movie sets, but this actually shows the real thing — and that's why it won best picture."

"Moonlight" won the Academy Award Sunday night for best picture, best supporting actor and best adapted screenplay. It was nominated in five additional categories. It follows the life of a young black man as he grows up in a poverty-stricken neighborhood while coming to terms with his own homosexuality.

Director Barry Jenkins "came from the same grounds I came from, from the same city," said Larry Anderson, a Miami Northwestern junior who also had a role as an extra. Jenkins graduated from the same high school and had roots in a public housing project nicknamed "Pork & Beans" familiar to many students.

"Knowing that he came from the same — not just Miami, but Liberty City, same Pork & Beans, Miami Northwestern and the same programs that I've been part of, it tells me I can achieve in the same way as him," Anderson said.

Jenkins' wrote the screenplay for "Moonlight" with Tarell Alvin McCraney, who wrote the play on which the film is based. McCraney grew up in the same neighborhoods as Jenkins and attended the New World School of the Arts.

"This goes out to all those black and brown boys and girls and non-gender-conforming who don't see themselves," McCraney said during the ceremony.

Natalie Baldie, artistic director of the Performing and Visual Arts Center at Miami Northwestern, said she hopes the movie and its awards give students another perspective about getting out of Liberty City or going to college.

"It's giving them hope to get through and something to look forward to," Baldie said, sitting with Ani-Bello, Anderson and senior Amanda Ali, who also was an extra in the film. "We're used to seeing something about violence or rap music or athletes going to the NFL and things of that nature."

The film's theme of self-acceptance is one students and the community overall particularly need to hear, she added.

Ali said she hadn't been entirely aware of how "grown-up" the movie would be, "but that's good because it shows the truth."

The success of "Moonlight" also resonated Monday at Norland Middle School in Miami Gardens, where part of the film is set. Two young actors featured prominently in the film, Alex Hibbert and Jaden Piner, are Norland students, and about a dozen others were extras in the film.

Parents called and emailed Principal Ronald Redmon throughout the day to express pride in a program showing the talent coming Miami, he said.

"Today everyone beamed with pride. Parents were dropping off their kids with their horns blowing," Redmon said.

Graham Winick, the city of Miami Beach's film coordinator and a past president of Film Florida, called the success of "Moonlight" a cultural high-water mark for Miami and Florida, comparable to hosting an international art fair like Art Basel Miami Beach or preserving the area's signature Art Deco architecture. He pointed out that the film was made for just a fraction of the marketing budget for some of the films it was up against.

"That movie was $1.5 million in the can, and it looked amazing," Winick said. "It didn't have movie stars, but it still hit a nerve and got a release. People believed in it."

___

David Fischer in Miami contributed to this report.

'Biggest Loser' host Bob Harper says he was hospitalized with heart attack

Bob Harper was hospitalized after suffering a heart attack recently.

According to celebrity gossip site TMZ, Harper was working out in a New York gym two weeks ago when he collapsed. Fortunately, there was a doctor in the gym at the same time who was able to perform CPR and used paddles to keep him alive.

>> Read more trending stories

Harper was later taken to a hospital and claims that he was in a coma for two days. TMZ said he was hospitalized for eight days before being released and has remained in New York since the incident. His doctors have reportedly not cleared him to fly and return to his home in Los Angeles.

People reported that it confirmed the news and that he posted a photo on Instagram Wednesday with the caption, "My word of the day… LUCKY."

My word of the day... LUCKY A post shared by Bob Harper (@trainerbob) on Feb 22, 2017 at 4:48am PST

He told the tabloid that he is improving and, for now, his only exercise is limited walking.

The host also said that heart attacks run in his family and that his mother died from a heart attack, according to TMZ.

Harper himself confirmed the news Monday with another Instagram post of him in a hospital gown and his dog Karl.

"Well I guess you all heard what happened. Two weeks ago yesterday I had a heart attack," Harper wrote. "I am feeling better. Just taking it easy. Karl has been a great nurse. I want to thank everyone for the outpouring of messages and support. It feels good to be cared about. I've been home for 8 days now. Again, THANK YOU SO MUCH!! I'm lucky to have such good friends and family to take care of me right now."

Well I guess you all heard what happened. Two weeks ago yesterday I had a heart attack. I am feeling better. Just taking it easy. KARL has been a great nurse. I want to thank everyone for the outpouring of messages and support. It feels good to be cared about. I've been home for 8 days now. Again, THANK YOU SO MUCH!! I'm lucky to have such good friends and family to take care of me right now. A post shared by Bob Harper (@trainerbob) on Feb 27, 2017 at 2:37pm PST

Kelcie Willis with the Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Firm says several mistakes caused Oscars best picture gaffe

The accounting firm responsible for the integrity of the Academy Awards said Monday that its staffers did not move quickly enough to correct the biggest error in Oscars history — the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, wrote in a statement that several mistakes were made and two of its partners assigned to the prestigious awards show did not act quickly enough when "La La Land" was mistakenly announced as the best picture winner. Three of the film's producers spoke before the actual winner, the coming-of-age drama "Moonlight," was announced.

"PwC takes full responsibility for the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols during last night's Oscars," PwC wrote. It said its partner, Brian Cullinan, mistakenly handed presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway an envelope containing the winner of the best actress award.

"Once the error occurred, protocols for correcting it were not followed through quickly enough by Mr. Cullinan or his partner," the statement read.

It did not address in detail which protocols were violated, or say whether a tweet Cullinan sent about best actress winner Emma Stone before the best picture announcement contributed to the mistake.

The firm, which has handled Oscar winner announcements for eight decades, apologized to Beatty, Dunaway, the cast and crew of "La La Land" and "Moonlight," the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and host Jimmy Kimmel.

"We wish to extend our deepest gratitude to each of them for the graciousness they displayed during such a difficult moment," the statement said. "For the past 83 years, the academy has entrusted PwC with the integrity of the awards process during the ceremony, and last night we failed the academy."

The statement came after nearly a day of speculation about how the worst gaffe in Oscars history unfolded. The fiasco launched countless punchlines, memes and a probe of what went wrong.

The mystery deepened Monday afternoon after the Wall Street Journal reported that Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read. The tweet, sent moments before the best picture announcement, raised the question of whether the accountant was distracted from the task at hand. Although the tweet was deleted from the social media site, a copy of it was kept by Google and available through a cache page.

The mistaken announcement altered the usual celebration that follows the coronation of a best picture winner. The only Oscars mistake that came close occurred in 1964, when Sammy Davis was given the wrong envelope for best music score winner but made a quick correction.

The "La La Land"-''Moonlight" mix-up, in contrast, took a painfully long time to be announced, with two-plus minutes elapsing before it was announced to the moviemakers and the world at large.

The embarrassing episode stepped squarely on what should have been a night of high-fiving for the academy. After last year's awards were clouded by the #OscarsSoWhite protests, diversity ruled Sunday as actors Viola Davis ("Fences") and Mahershala Ali ("Moonlight") were among the people of color claiming trophies, while "Moonlight" focused on African-American characters.

PwC, which originated in London over a century ago, was quick to apologize to the movies involved. The academy has not yet commented on the mistake.

On paper, the process for announcing Oscars winners seems straight-forward. As per protocol, Cullinan and PwC colleague Martha Ruiz toted briefcases to the awards via the red carpet, each holding an identical set of envelopes for the show's 24 categories. The accountants also memorize the winners.

During the telecast, the accountants were stationed in the Dolby Theatre wings, one stage left and one stage right, to give presenters their category's envelope before they went on stage. Most presenters entered stage right, where Cullinan was posted and where he handed Beatty and Dunaway the errant envelope.

Yet the previous award, best actress, had been presented by Leonardo DiCaprio, who entered stage left and received the envelope from Ruiz. That left a duplicate, unopened envelope for best actress at stage right.

"It's a simple process, if a painstaking one," said Dan Lyle, who had Oscar duties for Price Waterhouse for 11 years in the 1980s and '90s. Accountants attended rehearsals to learn whether presenters would enter from the right or left. But given the possibility of last-minute changes, both accountants had a full set of envelopes.

When Lyle ended up with a redundant envelope for a category handled by his colleague, he said, he got it out of the way by stuffing it in a pocket or otherwise discarding it before moving on to the next award.

Lyle said there were always nerves no matter how much care was taken. Each time an envelope was dispensed, he said, he hoped that "I handed over the right one." If the wrong winner was announced, a PwC accountant was to quickly dash to the stage to correct the error.

Such a rapid response should have occurred Sunday but didn't, as confusion reigned onstage. Backstage, however, people were working calmly to right the ship, said Matt Sayles, a freelance photographer for The Associated Press.

"It was more crazy onstage. I feel like backstage knew that something was wrong and they handled it," Sayles said. "They clearly knew that something was wrong."

Sayles, who has shot five Academy Awards from a backstage position just out of the sight of television cameras, said the result of the mix-up was a more subdued celebration from winners including "Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins.

One observer said London-based PwC is scrambling now. Nigel Currie, an independent branding specialist in London with decades' worth of industry experience, said this mistake is "as bad a mess-up as you could imagine."

"They had a pretty simple job to do and messed it up spectacularly," he said. "They will be in deep crisis talks on how to deal with it."

___

AP writers Lynn Elber in Los Angeles and Pan Pylas in London, and AP Social Media Editor Eric Carvin in New York contributed to this report.

Firm says several mistakes caused Oscars best picture gaffe

The accounting firm responsible for the integrity of the Academy Awards said Monday that its staffers did not move quickly enough to correct the biggest error in Oscars history — the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, wrote in a statement that several mistakes were made and two of its partners assigned to the prestigious awards show did not act quickly enough when "La La Land" was mistakenly announced as the best picture winner. Three of the film's producers spoke before the actual winner, the coming-of-age drama "Moonlight," was announced.

"PwC takes full responsibility for the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols during last night's Oscars," PwC wrote. It said its partner, Brian Cullinan, mistakenly handed presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway an envelope containing the winner of the best actress award.

"Once the error occurred, protocols for correcting it were not followed through quickly enough by Mr. Cullinan or his partner," the statement read.

It did not address in detail which protocols were violated, or say whether a tweet Cullinan sent about best actress winner Emma Stone before the best picture announcement contributed to the mistake.

The firm, which has handled Oscar winner announcements for eight decades, apologized to Beatty, Dunaway, the cast and crew of "La La Land" and "Moonlight," the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and host Jimmy Kimmel.

"We wish to extend our deepest gratitude to each of them for the graciousness they displayed during such a difficult moment," the statement said. "For the past 83 years, the academy has entrusted PwC with the integrity of the awards process during the ceremony, and last night we failed the academy."

The statement came after nearly a day of speculation about how the worst gaffe in Oscars history unfolded. The fiasco launched countless punchlines, memes and a probe of what went wrong.

The mystery deepened Monday afternoon after the Wall Street Journal reported that Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read. The tweet, sent moments before the best picture announcement, raised the question of whether the accountant was distracted from the task at hand. Although the tweet was deleted from the social media site, a copy of it was kept by Google and available through a cache page.

The mistaken announcement altered the usual celebration that follows the coronation of a best picture winner. The only Oscars mistake that came close occurred in 1964, when Sammy Davis was given the wrong envelope for best music score winner but made a quick correction.

The "La La Land"-''Moonlight" mix-up, in contrast, took a painfully long time to be announced, with two-plus minutes elapsing before it was announced to the moviemakers and the world at large.

The embarrassing episode stepped squarely on what should have been a night of high-fiving for the academy. After last year's awards were clouded by the #OscarsSoWhite protests, diversity ruled Sunday as actors Viola Davis ("Fences") and Mahershala Ali ("Moonlight") were among the people of color claiming trophies, while "Moonlight" focused on African-American characters.

PwC, which originated in London over a century ago, was quick to apologize to the movies involved. The academy has not yet commented on the mistake.

On paper, the process for announcing Oscars winners seems straight-forward. As per protocol, Cullinan and PwC colleague Martha Ruiz toted briefcases to the awards via the red carpet, each holding an identical set of envelopes for the show's 24 categories. The accountants also memorize the winners.

During the telecast, the accountants were stationed in the Dolby Theatre wings, one stage left and one stage right, to give presenters their category's envelope before they went on stage. Most presenters entered stage right, where Cullinan was posted and where he handed Beatty and Dunaway the errant envelope.

Yet the previous award, best actress, had been presented by Leonardo DiCaprio, who entered stage left and received the envelope from Ruiz. That left a duplicate, unopened envelope for best actress at stage right.

"It's a simple process, if a painstaking one," said Dan Lyle, who had Oscar duties for Price Waterhouse for 11 years in the 1980s and '90s. Accountants attended rehearsals to learn whether presenters would enter from the right or left. But given the possibility of last-minute changes, both accountants had a full set of envelopes.

When Lyle ended up with a redundant envelope for a category handled by his colleague, he said, he got it out of the way by stuffing it in a pocket or otherwise discarding it before moving on to the next award.

Lyle said there were always nerves no matter how much care was taken. Each time an envelope was dispensed, he said, he hoped that "I handed over the right one." If the wrong winner was announced, a PwC accountant was to quickly dash to the stage to correct the error.

Such a rapid response should have occurred Sunday but didn't, as confusion reigned onstage. Backstage, however, people were working calmly to right the ship, said Matt Sayles, a freelance photographer for The Associated Press.

"It was more crazy onstage. I feel like backstage knew that something was wrong and they handled it," Sayles said. "They clearly knew that something was wrong."

Sayles, who has shot five Academy Awards from a backstage position just out of the sight of television cameras, said the result of the mix-up was a more subdued celebration from winners including "Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins.

One observer said London-based PwC is scrambling now. Nigel Currie, an independent branding specialist in London with decades' worth of industry experience, said this mistake is "as bad a mess-up as you could imagine."

"They had a pretty simple job to do and messed it up spectacularly," he said. "They will be in deep crisis talks on how to deal with it."

___

AP writers Lynn Elber in Los Angeles and Pan Pylas in London, and AP Social Media Editor Eric Carvin in New York contributed to this report.

Chance the Rapper, Rauner to talk Chicago school funding

Grammy-winning artist Chance the Rapper and Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner plan to meet this week to discuss funding education in Chicago.

The hip-hop performer from Chicago, whose real name is Chancelor Bennett, said Monday on Twitter that he'll meet privately with Rauner on Wednesday. He says he's eager to hear Rauner's ideas.

The Republican governor's official Twitter account responded, saying "Looking forward to hearing your ideas, too."

Talk of the meeting started after Rauner congratulated the rapper via Twitter for winning three Grammy Awards earlier this month, saying the state "is proud that you're one of our own." Chance replied that he'd "love" to meet with Rauner.

Chicago Public Schools is suing Rauner and state education officials, saying the way Illinois funds schools violates the civil rights of the district's predominantly minority students.

___

This story has been corrected to show that the rapper's first name is Chancelor, not Chancellor.

Here's what happened onstage during the Oscars' mistake

or maybe farce — directors would surely reject it. But let's set the scene anyway for the Academy Awards drama over what film did, and didn't, win the Oscar for best picture on Sunday night.

We pan in on the stage of the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, where actors Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway are about to announce best picture, the culmination of entertainment's biggest awards show. Beatty opens a red envelope and looks at the card inside, giving a double-take. He looks inside the envelope to see if there's anything else there.

BEATTY: "The Academy Award..."

He pauses, looks at the envelope again.

BEATTY: "For best picture..."

He pauses again and looks offstage, then hands the envelope to Dunaway, who gives it a quick glance.

DUNAWAY: "La La Land."

The audience applauds, as the cast, crew and producers of "La La Land" take the stage to accept what many had anticipated, the coveted honor of best picture. Producers Jordan Horowitz and Marc Platt give speeches, but something seems amiss as Platt speaks. There's commotion among the people standing behind him as a man wearing headphones appears and checks red envelopes being held by producers.

PLATT: "Keep dreaming, because the dreams we dream today will provide the love, compassion and the humanity that will narrate the story of our lives tomorrow."

The third producer, Fred Berger, takes his turn at the microphone and speaks briefly before looking at a confused scene behind him.

BERGER: "We lost, by the way."

HOROWITZ: "There's a mistake. 'Moonlight,' you guys won best picture. This is not a joke."

PLATT: "This is not a joke. I'm afraid they read the wrong thing."

HOROWITZ: "This is not a joke. 'Moonlight' has won best picture."

Horowitz takes a card from Beatty and holds it up. The camera pans in so the words are visible: "Moonlight" has indeed won best picture. Host Jimmy Kimmel approaches the microphone and alludes to Steve Harvey, whose 2015 reading of the wrong Miss Universe winner instantly becomes the second most-embarrassing awards show flub.

KIMMEL: "Guys. This is very unfortunate what happened. Personally, I blame Steve Harvey for this."

Kimmel looks at Horowitz.

KIMMEL: "I would like to see you get an Oscar anyway. Why can't we just give out a whole bunch of them?"

HOROWITZ: "I'm going to be really proud to hand this to my friends at 'Moonlight.'"

KIMMEL: "That's nice of you."

Beatty approaches the microphone.

BEATTY: "Hello? Hello?"

KIMMEL: "Warren, what did you do?"

BEATTY: "I want to tell you what happened. I opened the envelope and it said 'Emma Stone, La La Land.' That's why I took such a long look at Faye and you. I wasn't trying to be funny."

By now, the cast and crew of "Moonlight" is taking the stage, supplanting the folks from "La La Land," who were slipping away. The camera switches to people in the audience who look dumbfounded. Matt Damon whistles. Barry Jenkins, creator of "Moonlight," approaches the microphone.

JENKINS: "Very clearly in my dreams, this could not be true. But to hell with dreams, I'm done with it, because this is true. Oh, my goodness."

Jenkins finishes his speech. Then Kimmel takes the microphone again.

KIMMEL: "Well, I don't know what happened. I blame myself. ... It's just an awards show ... I knew I would screw this show up. I really did ... I promise I'll never come back."

___

This story has been corrected to show that Jordan Horowitz is one of the producers of "La La Land."

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