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Melania Trump wears sky-blue cashmere Ralph Lauren ensemble

"It was important to us to uphold and celebrate the tradition of creating iconic American style for this moment," Lauren's company said in a statement.

For night, the new first lady wore ivory, in an off-the-shoulder gown by Herve Pierre, former creative director of Carolina Herrera, and first daughter Ivanka Trump wore a sparkling, blush-tone gown by Herrera, Women's Wear Daily reported.

On Friday morning, Mrs. Trump's hair was in a soft updo and she wore long, sky-blue suede gloves and matching stilettos as she and her husband were greeted at the White House by President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, the latter in a deep-red belted short-sleeve tweed dress by Jason Wu. It had black trim and a matching double-breasted coat.

President Donald Trump, wearing a red tie and black overcoat, opted to leave his suit jacket unbuttoned.

Ivanka, Trump's oldest daughter, chose white Oscar de la Renta with a tiny American flag pin, and Hillary Clinton showed up in an off-white Ralph Lauren pantsuit that harkened back to one she wore in July to accept the Democratic nomination for president. Her overcoat matched the ensemble. Tiffany Trump also opted for white and wore a double-breasted coat.

Who else made a large fashion statement for Trump's big day? His senior adviser, Kellyanne Conway, in a Gucci military-style wool coat of red, white and blue, with two rows of cat-head buttons and a red cloche hat. She described her look as "Trump revolutionary wear." Social media users had a field day, the most polite comparison being to the uniform costumes in "The Nutcracker" ballet. Conway's coat retails for $3,600.

Mrs. Trump's look, with its bolero-style jacket, prompted comparisons to a fashion icon of the past, Jacqueline Kennedy, who wore an outfit by Oleg Cassini with a matching pillbox hat to husband John F. Kennedy's 1961 inauguration.

"I think she looked sensational," New York fashion expert Hal Rubenstein said of the new first lady's style. "She's not a huge risk-taker, but she dresses in that smart, sophisticated Upper East Side urban style."

On Thursday, when inauguration events kicked off, Mrs. Trump shimmered in gold for the Candlelight Dinner in a long-sleeve beaded gown by Reem Acra. Ivanka Trump wore a white cap-sleeve de la Renta gown with a large black bow at the back.

For the wreath-laying ceremony earlier that day at Arlington National Cemetery, Mrs. Trump picked a black military-style coat by the New York-based designer Norisol Ferrari. Ivanka Trump provided Thursday's pop of color in kelly green de la Renta.

Will Melania Trump continue to be inspired, fashion-wise, by the late Mrs. Onassis? Will she embrace young design talent and the fashion world as wholeheartedly as Mrs. Obama?

The new first lady is under no obligation to be inspired at all by those who came before, Rubenstein said. One thing's for sure, he added:

"She knows her clothes, but that's her wardrobe. There's a difference between a wardrobe and a mission and I think right now she hasn't shown that card, and she may not."

Here's Why You Can Thank (or Blame) Meat Loaf for Donald Trump's Presidency

Could it be that Meat Loaf had a much bigger impact on world history than we ever thought possible?

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Classic Rock Vs. Donald Trump: Musicians Who Already Can't Stand Our New President

Donald Trump's ascension to the presidency has not exactly been met with classic rock jubilation.

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Heart's Nancy Wilson Announces New Side Project Roadcase Royale

Heart's Nancy Wilson has a little time off from the band this year — and she's using to start up a new project, Roadcase Royale. Continue reading…

Premiere of 'A Dog's Purpose' canceled amid treatment issue

This weekend's premiere of "A Dog's Purpose" has been canceled following the release of a video that appears to show a frightened dog being forced into churning water during production of the film.

TMZ published the video Wednesday showing a man struggling to put a dog into a pool of rushing water while the animal fights to stay out.

Producer Amblin Entertainment and distributor Universal Pictures haven't disputed the authenticity of the footage.

They say in a joint statement that Universal decided to cancel the premiere because Amblin's review of the video is ongoing and they don't want "anything to overshadow this film that celebrates the relationship between animals and humans."

"While we are all disheartened by the appearance of an animal in distress, everyone has assured us that Hercules the German Shepherd was not harmed throughout the filmmaking," the statement said.

The companies say the film will be released nationwide as scheduled Jan. 27.

W. Bruce Cameron, who wrote the novel on which the film is based, says the events in the video don't reflect what he saw when he visited the set in person.

"The ethic of everyone was the safety and comfort of the dogs," Cameron wrote in a Facebook post Friday.

"The dog was not terrified and not thrown in the water," he continued. "When he was asked to perform the stunt from the other side of the pool, which was not how he had been doing it all day, he balked. The mistake was trying to dip the dog in the water to show him it was okay."

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals called the cancellation of the premiere appropriate after earlier calling for a boycott of the film.

Premiere of 'A Dog's Purpose' canceled amid treatment issue

This weekend's premiere of "A Dog's Purpose" has been canceled following the release of a video that appears to show a frightened dog being forced into churning water during production of the film.

TMZ published the video Wednesday showing a man struggling to put a dog into a pool of rushing water while the animal fights to stay out.

Producer Amblin Entertainment and distributor Universal Pictures haven't disputed the authenticity of the footage.

They say in a joint statement that Universal decided to cancel the premiere because Amblin's review of the video is ongoing and they don't want "anything to overshadow this film that celebrates the relationship between animals and humans."

"While we are all disheartened by the appearance of an animal in distress, everyone has assured us that Hercules the German Shepherd was not harmed throughout the filmmaking," the statement said.

The companies say the film will be released nationwide as scheduled Jan. 27.

W. Bruce Cameron, who wrote the novel on which the film is based, says the events in the video don't reflect what he saw when he visited the set in person.

"The ethic of everyone was the safety and comfort of the dogs," Cameron wrote in a Facebook post Friday.

"The dog was not terrified and not thrown in the water," he continued. "When he was asked to perform the stunt from the other side of the pool, which was not how he had been doing it all day, he balked. The mistake was trying to dip the dog in the water to show him it was okay."

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals called the cancellation of the premiere appropriate after earlier calling for a boycott of the film.

Alec Baldwin, Cher, Robert De Niro among celebrities at anti-Trump rally

Nicole Moschella contributed to this report.

On the eve of Donald Trump being sworn in as the United States' 45th president, a massive rally was staged in the streets of New York near Trump International Hotel and headlined by a man who has played Trump on TV: Alec Baldwin.

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Attended by the likes of Robert De Niro, Michael Moore, Cynthia Nixon, Mark Ruffalo, Julianne Moore, Cher, the Rev. Al Sharpton and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, the protest focused on fighting a perceived shift to authoritarianism under the Trump administration. Baldwin, often criticized by Trump on Twitter for his parody of him on "Saturday Night Live," assumed his Trump character at different points as he addressed the crowd.

Thousands filled CentralParkWest tonight to tell Trump he's not going to get away with any of it. (Pic: me w/ DeNiro) pic.twitter.com/mkMZ5yR2T2— Michael Moore (@MMFlint) January 20, 2017

In a serious tone, Baldwin said: "Donald Trump and Steve Bannon and Mike Pence and all these people that are a part of Trump's administration think you're going to lay down. The one thing they don't realize is that New Yorkers never lay down ... Are you going to fight? Are we going to have 100 days of resistance?

"Children ... they're never too young for you to start to teach them about what's going on here. They're never too young for you to teach them what a real American is. And an American wants full participation and full transparency of their government. And we've never been further away from that than we are now ... But there is hope. The hope is us and us fighting. One hundred days of resistance."

Cher, however, said it's "hard to have hope right now."

"I couldn't watch him come into Washington. I don't know that I will be able to watch the news for a very long time," she said.

"I kept seeing all of the things that he was doing, and I kept saying, 'This will be the thing,'" she said in reference to Trump's controversial actions before the election. "He's getting away with things that no president has gotten away with and it doesn't seem to bother anyone."

Despite voicing her opposition for the new president, Cher said that she hopes he'll make positive change. She also clarified her opinions, saying she doesn't hate his supporters.

With my fellow organizers of tonight's anti-Trump rally - Fisher Stevens and Mark Ruffalo. pic.twitter.com/yTAkje6uEY— Michael Moore (@MMFlint) January 20, 2017

DeNiro called Trump "a bad example of this country and this city."

"I don't care where he goes, I just never thought he'd go to Washington," he said.

Moore, who helped organize the rally, told the crowd: "We're going to win, folks. A little bit of pain, a little bit of pain, but a lot of work on our part will stop this man. He will not last the four years. It's a dangerous combination, a narcissist and a public official because it's all about what's in it for me -- me, me, me ... And when they think like that, that's when they break the law, and that's when he'll go down."

Review: 'Slenderman' explores online craze, attempted murder

The Slender Man craze swept the younger digerati while their unwitting elders occupied themselves online with Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

Only in May 2014 did the general public hear of Slender Man when news erupted that two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls had lured a friend into the woods and stabbed her 19 times.

Three years after the attack, the girls are set to be tried as adults for attempted murder.

Why did they do it? Turns out, to appease and curry favor with this Slender Man character.

Slender Man, it turned out, was all the rage for youngsters worldwide. "He" was born with an online post in June 2009 as a mysterious specter photo-shopped into everyday images of children at play. From that tantalizing start, Slender Man (also known as Slenderman or just Slender) exploded as a crowdsourced canon of belief and fantasy.

Slender Man was typically depicted as a spidery figure in a black suit with a featureless white face. He was regarded by his devotees as alternately a sinister force and an avenging angel. He flourished as a communal boogeyman and, at the same time, an abiding savior who found global expression in fan fiction, artwork and videos.

Trevor J. Blank, a digital folklorist, declares in the film, "If there's one thing the cult of Slender Man is about, it's about making it all believable, especially by remaining unverifiable. And that's really how folk belief works. Because you can't prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that Slender Man is fake or real."

A film that explores the Slender Man effect, for both better and worse, would have been valuable for all non-initiates and, especially, parents.

HBO's "Beware the Slenderman" isn't that film. Airing Monday at 10 p.m. EST, it promises to examine "how an urban myth could take root in impressionable young minds, leading to an unspeakable act." But its would-be murderers are not your everyday impressionable youths. One, Anissa Weier, is found to have a delusional disorder. The other, Morgan Geyser, is diagnosed with early childhood schizophrenia.

As such, the case of Morgan and Anissa hardly seems representative of anything beyond a pair of already troubled young people who spun out tragically. For them, Slender Man just seems to have been the last straw.

The film boasts of its access to these girls, their families and abundant home video, as well as courtroom testimony and interrogation footage, all of which grinds on for the film's two bloated hours.

So sharply focused on the perpetrators is the film that it scarcely even acknowledges the victim, Payton Leutner, Morgan's friend since kindergarten, who, apart from her role as attackee, seems extraneous to the film's intended narrative. (Only late in the film are viewers even tipped to Payton's present-day condition: She did recover — physically, at least. But we learn nothing more about her.)

The film tries, but fails, to put the crime in a cultural context. Experts and other talking heads weigh in on the larger implications of the Slender Man mania. But the film prefers to savor more than probe, as if having fallen under Slender Man's spell. Not satisfied to provide an instructive sample of online Slender Man imagery, it becomes an exercise in macabre excess. Basking in Slender Man visuals and a creepy musical score, the documentary seems out to be its own horror flick.

As for the current status of Slender Man among global youth (has the craze mushroomed further or leveled off — or is it soooo over?) the viewer is told nothing.

Instead, the film festishizes a single ghastly crime for which it seems to hold Slender Man accountable.

Morgan's mother, like the girls' other parents, seeks refuge in her happy recollections. Struggling to see her daughter in the best light possible, she recalls that Morgan "has always marched to the beat of her own drum."

But is it really hers? Or was it Slender Man's? Expect no answers in this dreary documentary.

_____

EDITOR'S NOTE — Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at fmoore@ap.org and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier. Past stories are available at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/frazier-moore

_____

Online:

http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/beware-the-slenderman

Surviving Status Quo Members Ride Tour Bus to Rick Parfitt's Funeral

Status Quo guitarist Rick Parfitt has been laid to rest with a "gig-themed" funeral that found his surviving bandmates arriving in a tour bus.

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Adele to perform at the Grammy Awards next month

Adele is set to take the stage at next month's Grammy Awards, where she is nominated for album, song and record of the year.

The Recording Academy announced Friday that Adele will perform at the Feb. 12 show at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Previously announced performers include Metallica, Carrie Underwood, John Legend and Keith Urban.

Adele had a hiccup during her Grammy performance last year after a microphone inside a piano fell onto the instrument's strings.

This year the 10-time Grammy winner has five nominations, including album of the year and best pop vocal album for "25." Her No. 1 hit "Hello" is nominated for record and song of the year as well as best pop solo performance.

The Grammys will air on CBS. The show will be hosted by James Corden.

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