Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

entertainment

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

'Avatar' sequels now scheduled to start in December 2020

James Cameron has set the release dates for the next four "Avatar" sequels, with the first coming in 2020.

The movie's Facebook page Saturday posted a photo of Cameron and his massive film crew, who have been working on all four films simultaneously. The post said "Avatar 2" will hit theaters Dec. 18, 2020, and "Avatar 3" comes a year later, on Dec. 17, 2021.

The franchise then takes a three-year hiatus before returning with "Avatar 4" on Dec. 20, 2024, and "Avatar 5" on Dec. 19, 2025. The first sequel had been expected in 2018 but Cameron this year said that timetable wouldn't be met.

The original 2009 "Avatar" film has netted over $2.7 billion, centering on the conflict between humans and the blue-skinned alien race Na'vi of Pandora.

'Avatar' sequels now scheduled to start in December 2020

James Cameron has set the release dates for the next four "Avatar" sequels, with the first coming in 2020.

The movie's Facebook page Saturday posted a photo of Cameron and his massive film crew, who have been working on all four films simultaneously. The post said "Avatar 2" will hit theaters Dec. 18, 2020, and "Avatar 3" comes a year later, on Dec. 17, 2021.

The franchise then takes a three-year hiatus before returning with "Avatar 4" on Dec. 20, 2024, and "Avatar 5" on Dec. 19, 2025. The first sequel had been expected in 2018 but Cameron this year said that timetable wouldn't be met.

The original 2009 "Avatar" film has netted over $2.7 billion, centering on the conflict between humans and the blue-skinned alien race Na'vi of Pandora.

Ted Nugent and David Crosby Exchange Insults After White House Visit

David Crosby called Ted Nugent a "brainless twit" and Nuge called Croz a "lost soul." Continue reading…

Actress Octavia Spencer to speak at Kent State commencement

Kent State University's first universitywide commencement will get a touch of Hollywood as Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer speaks to graduates of the northeastern Ohio school.

Spencer recently starred as mathematician Dorothy Vaughan in the drama "Hidden Figures." The film tells the true story of several female African-American mathematicians at NASA key to the 1960's era space race between the United States and Russia.

Spencer says it's an honor to share her personal story at Kent State.

She says she hopes her message "inspires others to dream big, never give up and pursue their passion despite the obstacles that might get in the way."

The May 13 ceremony will be the first where all graduates from the eight-campus system are honored in one place.

Actress Octavia Spencer to speak at Kent State commencement

Kent State University's first universitywide commencement will get a touch of Hollywood as Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer speaks to graduates of the northeastern Ohio school.

Spencer recently starred as mathematician Dorothy Vaughan in the drama "Hidden Figures." The film tells the true story of several female African-American mathematicians at NASA key to the 1960's era space race between the United States and Russia.

Spencer says it's an honor to share her personal story at Kent State.

She says she hopes her message "inspires others to dream big, never give up and pursue their passion despite the obstacles that might get in the way."

The May 13 ceremony will be the first where all graduates from the eight-campus system are honored in one place.

United Airlines CEO's Promotion Isn't Going As Planned

United CEO Oscar Munoz agreed not to take his expected promotion as chairman after a passenger was dragged off one of the company's flights.

Kathryn Bigelow on VR after her first try: 'I love it'

As a filmmaker drawn to the most visceral forms of cinema, it was probably inevitable that Kathryn Bigelow's high-adrenaline curiosities would lead her to virtual reality.

The Oscar-winning director on Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival premiered her first VR experience, "The Protectors: Walk in the Rangers' Shoes," an eight-minute, 360-degree plunge into the lives of the Garamba National Park rangers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Bigelow directed it with Imraan Ismail, a virtual-reality veteran, and the two used the nascent, immersive medium to give a full sense of the dangers the 200 ragtag rangers face daily in guarding the Delaware-sized park, including its hundreds of perishing elephants, from the constant plundering of poachers and gunmen.

"The most important thing was to put a human face on this issue," Bigelow said in an interview alongside Ismail in the back room of a Tribeca restaurant. "My hope was that if the eyes of the world realized and recognized the kind of sacrifice they're making, then perhaps not only could they be better equipped but it also might raise recruitment."

National Geographic will release the film May 1 on the VR app Within, and on YouTube and Facebook360 the following week. It's a co-production of the VR company Here Be Dragons and the film production company Annapurna Pictures — making it a kind of fusion of both worlds.

Even in its brief eight minutes, viewers of "The Protectors" will readily recognize the same cinematic command Bigelow brought to her Academy Award winner "The Hurt Locker" and her most recent film, the Osama bin Laden hunt thriller "Zero Dark Thirty."

"The Protectors" follows the rangers through the tall grass, on the trail of poachers and in an apparent fire-fight with attackers. In one memorable shot, a helicopter lands right on top of the viewer.

Bigelow's virtual reality debut left her excited for its journalistic potential to inform and foster empathy.

"I love it," Bigelow said of the medium. "I think it's all about content, though. It's not tech first; it's content first.

"It opens up corridors to awareness and information about social geopolitical issues that you would otherwise have very little access to," she added. "That's the beauty of journalism is to bring you to environments, stories, profiles of people that you otherwise have little or no access to. I think what's beautiful is the piece is that it's very objective. Here are these men and these are their thoughts. It's very intimate and yet what they're doing is so profound."

A number of big-name filmmakers have recently tried their hand at VR, including Jon Favreau and Alejandro Inarritu, who's to debut a virtual reality work next month at the Cannes Film Festival.

But Bigelow, 65, may be the most significant of the bunch because of her interest in getting as close as possible to her subjects and in combining storytelling with journalism. She often works in tandem with journalist-screenwriter Mark Boal, including on their upcoming feature film, "Detroit," about the 1967 riots.

Ismail, too, has a journalistic sensibility. His award-winning "The Displaced," a New York Times VR film Ismail co-directed, followed three children refugees from Syria, Ukraine and Sudan.

With "The Protectors," he said: "Hopefully we're able to tell some of that story and make this complex, abstract position something a little more granular that you can grasp. And you can be like: 'That guy, I feel for him."

So does Bigelow see great potential in virtual reality?

"Hard to say," she responds. "I think so, if the desire to use it is content-driven and you want to have it be an experiential, totally immersive, empathetic understanding of the subject, then, yes, 100 percent. Not that film can't do that. Film, of course, can do that. But the beauty of this is there is a kind of 'x factor' that it provides."

"What's exciting is how physical it is. The sound is dictating your movement. It's like, 'Oh, the helicopter is landing on top of you and then a guy is jumping out the back of it.' It pulls you around," said Bigelow. "It's not passive. I always think, though, (in movies), there is engagement. The screen asks you to lean in and you ask the screen to interact and you kind of meet in the middle. But what's great here is there is no passive opportunity to experience this."

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Kathryn Bigelow on VR after her first try: 'I love it'

As a filmmaker drawn to the most visceral forms of cinema, it was probably inevitable that Kathryn Bigelow's high-adrenaline curiosities would lead her to virtual reality.

The Oscar-winning director on Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival premiered her first VR experience, "The Protectors: Walk in the Rangers' Shoes," an eight-minute, 360-degree plunge into the lives of the Garamba National Park rangers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Bigelow directed it with Imraan Ismail, a virtual-reality veteran, and the two used the nascent, immersive medium to give a full sense of the dangers the 200 ragtag rangers face daily in guarding the Delaware-sized park, including its hundreds of perishing elephants, from the constant plundering of poachers and gunmen.

"The most important thing was to put a human face on this issue," Bigelow said in an interview alongside Ismail in the back room of a Tribeca restaurant. "My hope was that if the eyes of the world realized and recognized the kind of sacrifice they're making, then perhaps not only could they be better equipped but it also might raise recruitment."

National Geographic will release the film May 1 on the VR app Within, and on YouTube and Facebook360 the following week. It's a co-production of the VR company Here Be Dragons and the film production company Annapurna Pictures — making it a kind of fusion of both worlds.

Even in its brief eight minutes, viewers of "The Protectors" will readily recognize the same cinematic command Bigelow brought to her Academy Award winner "The Hurt Locker" and her most recent film, the Osama bin Laden hunt thriller "Zero Dark Thirty."

"The Protectors" follows the rangers through the tall grass, on the trail of poachers and in an apparent fire-fight with attackers. In one memorable shot, a helicopter lands right on top of the viewer.

Bigelow's virtual reality debut left her excited for its journalistic potential to inform and foster empathy.

"I love it," Bigelow said of the medium. "I think it's all about content, though. It's not tech first; it's content first.

"It opens up corridors to awareness and information about social geopolitical issues that you would otherwise have very little access to," she added. "That's the beauty of journalism is to bring you to environments, stories, profiles of people that you otherwise have little or no access to. I think what's beautiful is the piece is that it's very objective. Here are these men and these are their thoughts. It's very intimate and yet what they're doing is so profound."

A number of big-name filmmakers have recently tried their hand at VR, including Jon Favreau and Alejandro Inarritu, who's to debut a virtual reality work next month at the Cannes Film Festival.

But Bigelow, 65, may be the most significant of the bunch because of her interest in getting as close as possible to her subjects and in combining storytelling with journalism. She often works in tandem with journalist-screenwriter Mark Boal, including on their upcoming feature film, "Detroit," about the 1967 riots.

Ismail, too, has a journalistic sensibility. His award-winning "The Displaced," a New York Times VR film Ismail co-directed, followed three children refugees from Syria, Ukraine and Sudan.

With "The Protectors," he said: "Hopefully we're able to tell some of that story and make this complex, abstract position something a little more granular that you can grasp. And you can be like: 'That guy, I feel for him."

So does Bigelow see great potential in virtual reality?

"Hard to say," she responds. "I think so, if the desire to use it is content-driven and you want to have it be an experiential, totally immersive, empathetic understanding of the subject, then, yes, 100 percent. Not that film can't do that. Film, of course, can do that. But the beauty of this is there is a kind of 'x factor' that it provides."

"What's exciting is how physical it is. The sound is dictating your movement. It's like, 'Oh, the helicopter is landing on top of you and then a guy is jumping out the back of it.' It pulls you around," said Bigelow. "It's not passive. I always think, though, (in movies), there is engagement. The screen asks you to lean in and you ask the screen to interact and you kind of meet in the middle. But what's great here is there is no passive opportunity to experience this."

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Rob Lowe debuts as KFC’s newest colonel Sunday

Meet the new KFC colonel — actor Rob Lowe.

>> Read more trending news

The actor has played many roles through the years — as Sam Seaborn in “The West Wing” and Chris Traeger in “Parks and Recreation,” for example — but the former Brat Pack member who also starred in “St. Elmo’s Fire” is branching out into fast food.

Lowe will portray Colonel Harland Sanders beginning Sunday, donning the colonel’s white suit, black string tie and trademark goatee — but he also will be wearing a space suit, USA Today reported.

Lowe, 53, will be promoting KFC’s Zinger chicken sandwich, the restaurant chain announced Friday.

“My grandfather was the head of the Ohio chapter of the National Restaurant Association in the 1960s and took me to meet Colonel Harland Sanders when I was a kid,” Lowe told USA Today. “It was a big deal. I thought this would be a nice homage to both Colonel Sanders and to my grandfather.”

Among the other seven celebrities who have portrayed the founder of the Finger Lickin’ Good chicken are Darrell Hammond, Norm Macdonald, Jim Gaffigan and actors George Hamilton and Billy Zane.

Lowe, 53, has previously done commercials for DIRECTV.

The spicy Zinger sandwich will debut Monday in the United States after a 33-year stint overseas, KFC said. In a video promoting the sandwich, Lowe steps to the podium in his space suit and proclaims that “The time has come to explore beyond our known horizons.”

Lowe ends the video by asking, “Can you actually launch KFC’s world-famous Zinger chicken sandwich into space?”

His answer? “We certainly hope so. Our entire marketing campaign depends on it.

“But when we succeed, we will lick our fingers. We will lick our fingers good.”

Serena Williams shares another shot from Mexico vacation

Tennis star Serena Williams announced she was pregnant on Snapchat earlier this week as she shared — and then deleted — a photo of her baby bump with the cryptic caption “20 weeks” from her vacation in Mexico.

>> Read more trending news

The world’s top-ranked female player shared another shot from her getaway with fiancé and Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian on Instagram, Today reported. The 35-year-old is looking out over the Caribbean Sea at the edge of Mayan ruins in Tulum. Earlier, Williams posted a photo of herself and Ohanian horsing around in New Zealand last January.

Williams has won 72 career WTA titles during her career. She has won 23 Grand Slams in singles competition and has 14 in women's doubles. She also won two Grand Slam events in mixed doubles.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >