Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

entertainment

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

'Schmuck! This Is Your Soundtrack!': The Story of Simon & Garfunkel's 'The Graduate'

Director Mike Nichols used Simon & Garfunkel's music to provide the perfect backdrop to his film, 'The Graduate.'

Continue reading…

Jim Rodford, Argent and Kinks Bassist, Dies

Jim Rodford formed Argent with his cousin, Rod Argent, and later played with the Kinks and the Zombies.

Continue reading…

No respect? NFL Facebook Super Bowl promo ignores Jaguars, Eagles

The Jacksonville Jaguars have complained this season about not receiving any respect. They reached the AFC playoffs but were written off as losers, but Jacksonville defeated Buffalo and then stunned Pittsburgh during the first two rounds of the postseason.

>> Read more trending news

The Jaguars are decided underdogs against the defending Super Bowl champion New England Patriots in Sunday’s AFC Championship game, which is not surprising. But the Jaguars believe they have a chance to win, even if it appears like the NFL does not share that sentiment.

The NFL’s official Facebook page began touting Super Bowl LII, which will be held Feb. 4 in Minneapolis, with a teaser noting that “your team is headed to Super Bowl LII.” The promo was adorned with photos of Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and Minnesota Vikings quarterback Case Keenum, with no mention of the Jaguars or the Philadelphia Eagles, who are the No. 1 seed in the NFC.

Well, the NFL had to pick someone, and Brady, who has played in seven Super Bowls already, is a natural candidate.

It makes for great bulletin board material for the Jaguars and Eagles. Whether that translates into victories on Sunday remains to be seen.

Drummer Tris Imboden Quits Chicago

After 27 years, Tris Imboden has left Chicago, citing the band's busy touring schedule as the reason.

Continue reading…

You can't buy the gloves Tom Brady is wearing

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady deflected questions about why he wore gloves to an indoor media conference Friday, but Under Armour answered a simple question about them.

>> Read more trending news

An attempt to locate the gloves on the Under Armour website proved fruitless, and a query to the athletic apparel company revealed why.

The brand Brady wears is not available to the general public. 

“Thank you for reaching out,” Under Armour said in an email. “The exact glove that Tom is wearing in the picture is a glove that is only offered to Under Armour's NFL players.”

>> Patriots’ Tom Brady ‘not talking about’ possible hand injury

The company explained a similar glove available for purchase contains “HeatGear back of hand for moisture management and a compression like feel.” 

A spokesman for Under Armour added, “we are hopeful the additional exposure of the gloves will lead to an uptick in sales.”

Patriots’ Tom Brady ‘not talking about’ possible hand injury

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady spoke to the media Friday amid wild speculation about his status after a hand injury was listed earlier in the week. 

>> Read more trending news

“We'll see,” he said when asked about his status for Sunday's AFC Championship game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. 

Brady was spotted at practice Friday wearing red gloves on both of his hands, but it wasn't clear if he worked out with the team. 

The issues began Wednesday when Brady was included on the Patriots injury report. He met with medical staff while his teammates and coach Bill Belichick spoke with the media. 

When asked why he was wearing gloves, he responded, “I've worn them before.” 

He declined to discuss his injury or anything about practice. 

“Why are you wearing gloves inside?” one reporter asked. 

“She (reporter) already asked that,” Brady said.

Brady’s teammates, including center David Andrews and backup quarterback Brian Hoyer, avoided the issue. 

Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald reported Brady jammed his hand during practice and X-rays showed no structural damage.

Brady was listed on the Patriots’ injury report as non-participant at practice Thursday and canceled a second media availability later that day.

Brady has missed practices this season due to various minor injuries, but has not missed any games due to injury since 2008. 

Oscar winner, 'Peyton Place' star Dorothy Malone dead at 93

Dorothy Malone, who won an Oscar for her sultry role in the 1956 film “Written on the Wind” and starred in the television soap opera “Peyton Place,” died Friday in Dallas, The New York Times reported. She was 93.

>> Read more trending news

Malone’s daughter, Mimi Vanderstraaten, confirmed her mother’s death, the Times reported. Malone died a few days short of her 94th birthday at the assisted living facility where she had spent the last 10 years of her life.

Malone earned an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in her role as Marylee Hadley, the promiscuous daughter of a Texas oil tycoon, in Douglas Sirk’s 1956 drama, Entertainment Weekly reported. Malone performed a memorable mambo dance in the movie and made a play for Rock Hudson in the steamy melodrama. She starred along with Hudson, Robert Stack and Lauren Bacall. 

On television, Malone portrayed Constance Mackenzie in more than 400 episodes of “Peyton Place” from 1964 to 1968. “Peyton Place,” based on the best-selling novel by Grace Metalious. Her character had a dark secret about the birth of her daughter, played by 19-year-old Mia Farrow, and it led to a rating hit as television’s first nighttime soap opera, the Times reported.

Malone would reprise her role in two television movies, “Murder in Peyton Place” in 1977 and “Peyton Place: The Next Generation,” in 1985. 

Malone’s final movie appearance came in “Basic Instinct,” when she portrayed Hazel Dobkins, a mother accused of murdering her family, Entertainment Weekly reported.

“I came up with a conviction that most of the winners in this business became stars overnight by playing shady dames with sex appeal,” Malone said in 1967. “And I've been unfaithful or drunk or oversexed almost ever since — on the screen, of course.”

 

Autopsy: Tom Petty died of accidental drug overdose

Tom Petty died last year because of an accidental drug overdose that his family said occurred on the same day he found out his hip was broken after performing dozens of shows with a less serious injury.

His wife and daughter released the results of Petty's autopsy via a statement Friday on his Facebook page, moments before coroner's officials in Los Angeles released their findings and the rocker's full autopsy report. Dana and Adria Petty say they got the results from the coroner's office earlier in the day that the overdose was due to a variety of medications.

The coroner's findings showed Petty had a mix of prescription painkillers, sedatives and an antidepressant. Among the medications found in his system were fentanyl and oxycodone. An accidental overdose of fentanyl was also determined to have killed Prince in April 2016.

Petty suffered from emphysema, a fractured hip and knee problems that caused him pain, the family said, but he was still committed to touring.

He had just wrapped up a tour a few days before he died in October at age 66.

"On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication," his family's statement said, adding that he performed more than 50 concerts with a fractured hip.

The family said Petty had been prescribed various pain medications for his multitude of issues, including fentanyl patches, and "we feel confident that this was, as the coroner found, an unfortunate accident."

They added: "As a family we recognize this report may spark a further discussion on the opioid crisis and we feel that it is a healthy and necessary discussion and we hope in some way this report can save lives. Many people who overdose begin with a legitimate injury or simply do not understand the potency and deadly nature of these medications."

Painkillers and sedatives are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S., but both drug types slow users' heart rate and breathing. The Food and Drug Administration has warned against mixing them because the combination can lead to breathing problems, coma and death.

Government figures released in December showed that for the first time, the powerful painkiller fentanyl and its close opioid cousins played a bigger role in the deaths than any other legal or illegal drug, surpassing prescription pain pills and heroin.

Petty was a rock superstar with the persona of an everyman who drew upon the Byrds, Beatles and other bands he worshipped as a boy in Gainesville, Florida. He produced classics that include "Free Fallin'," ''Refugee" and "American Girl." He and his longtime band the Heartbreakers had recently completed a 40th-anniversary tour, one he hinted would be their last.

The shaggy-haired blond rose to success in the 1970s and went on to sell more than 80 million records. He was loved for his melodic hard rock, nasally vocals and down-to-earth style. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which inducted Petty and the Heartbreakers in 2002, praised them as "durable, resourceful, hard-working, likable and unpretentious."

___

Associated Press Writers Leanne Italie and Stephanie Nano contributed to this report.

Oscar winner Dorothy Malone, mom on 'Peyton Place,' has died

Actress Dorothy Malone, who won hearts of 1960s television viewers as the long-suffering mother in the nighttime soap "Peyton Place," died Friday in her hometown of Dallas at age 93.

Malone died in an assisted living center from natural causes days before her 94th birthday, said her daughter, Mimi Vanderstraaten.

After 11 years of mostly roles as loving sweethearts and wives, the brunette actress decided she needed to gamble on her career instead of playing it safe. She fired her agent, hired a publicist, dyed her hair blonde and sought a new image.

"I came up with a conviction that most of the winners in this business became stars overnight by playing shady dames with sex appeal," she recalled in 1967. She welcomed the offer for "Written on the Wind," in which she played an alcoholic nymphomaniac who tries to steal Rock Hudson from his wife, Lauren Bacall.

"And I've been unfaithful or drunk or oversexed almost ever since— on the screen, of course," she added.

When Jack Lemmon announced her as the winner of the 1956 Academy Award for best actress in a supporting role for the performance, she rushed to the stage of the Pantages Theatre and gave the longest speech of the evening. Even when Lemmon pointed to his watch, she continued undeterred, thanking "the Screen Actors and the Screen Extras guilds because we've had a lot of ups and downs together."

Malone's career waned after she reached 40, but she achieved her widest popularity with "Peyton Place," the 1964-69 ABC series based on Grace Metalious' steamy novel which became a hit 1957 movie starring Lana Turner. Malone assumed the Turner role as Constance Mackenzie, the bookshop operator who harbored a dark secret about the birth of her daughter Allison, played by the 19-year-old Mia Farrow.

ABC took a gamble on "Peyton Place," scheduling what was essentially a soap opera in prime time three times a week. It proved to be a ratings winner, winning new prominence for Malone and making stars of Farrow, Ryan O'Neal and Barbara Parkins.

"RIP Dorothy Malone, my beautiful TV mom for two amazing years," Farrow posted on Twitter.

Malone was offered a salary of $10,000 a week, huge money at the time. She settled for $7,000 with the proviso that she could leave the set at 5 p.m. so she could spend time with her young daughters, Mimi and Diane. She had been divorced from their father, a dashing Frenchman, Jacques Bergerac.

He had been discovered in France by Ginger Rogers, who married him and helped sponsor his acting career. They divorced, and he wooed and wedded Dorothy Malone in 1959. The marriage lasted five years and ended in a bitter court battle over custody of the daughters. "I wish Ginger had warned me what he was like," she lamented.

Malone married three times — two and a half by her calculation. Her second marriage, to stock broker Robert Tomarkin in 1969, was annulled after six weeks, Vanderstraaten said. A marriage in 1971 to motel chain executive Huston Bell also ended in divorce.

"I don't have very good luck in men," she admitted. "I had a tendency to endow a man qualities he did not possess." When a reporter suggested that she was well fixed because of the "Peyton Place" money, she replied: "Don't you believe it. I had a husband who took me to the cleaners. The day after we were married he was on the phone selling off my stuff."

When she was born in Chicago on Jan. 30, 1925, her name was Dorothy Eloise Maloney (it was changed to Malone in Hollywood "because it sounded too much like baloney," she said). When she was 3-months-old, her father — a telephone company auditor — moved the family to Dallas where she was raised in a strict Catholic household.

"As a child I lived by the rules," she said in 1967, "repeating them over and over, abiding by them before I fully understood their full meaning."

In 1942, an RKO talent scout saw her in a play at Southern Methodist University and recommended her for a studio contract. Her first three movie roles were walk-ons with no lines; her later roles were not much improvement. A move to Warner Bros. in 1945 provided greater opportunity.

In her first film at Warners, "The Big Sleep," she was cast as a bookshop clerk who is questioned by Philip Marlowe (Humphrey Bogart). She closes the shop, lets her hair down, takes off her glasses and seduces the private eye in a shelter from a thunderstorm. Her other films at the studio were less provocative. They included "Night and Day," ''One Sunday Afternoon," ''Colorado Territory," ''Young at Heart" and "Battle Cry."

Free of her Warner Bros. contract, Malone was cast by Universal in "Written on the Wind," which she later termed "the most fun picture I ever made." Important films followed: "Man of a Thousand Faces" as the wife of Lon Chaney (James Cagney); "Too Much, Too Soon" as Diana Barrymore, the alcoholic daughter of John Barrymore (Errol Flynn); "The Last Sunset," a western with Kirk Douglas and Rock Hudson.

None of the roles matched her Marylee Hadley in "Written on the Wind," and she welcomed the offer of "Peyton Place."

"At the time, doing television was considered professional death," she remarked in 1981. "However, I knew the series was going to be good, and I didn't have to prove myself as a star."

After the series ended, she appeared in TV movies, including "Murder in Peyton Place" (1977) and "Peyton Place — The Next Generation" (1985).

With her feature career virtually ended, she moved to Dallas to take care of her parents. After they died, she continued living in Dallas, making occasional returns to Hollywood and forays into dinner theaters. In 1992 she was again in a top feature, playing an aging lesbian murderer in the Sharon Stone-Michael Douglas sex thriller, "Basic Instinct." It was her final on-screen role.

Funeral arrangements were pending Friday. Besides Vanderstraaten, Malone is survived by a brother, retired U.S. District Judge Robert B. Maloney, and another daughter, Diane Thompson, all of Dallas.

___

The late entertainment writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

___

This story corrects the relationship of Robert B. Maloney, Malone's brother, not her son.

Tabloid held porn star's 2011 interview after Trump threat

A tabloid magazine held back from publishing an adult film star's 2011 account of an alleged affair with Donald Trump after the future president's personal lawyer threatened to sue, four former employees of the tabloid's publisher told The Associated Press.

In Touch magazine published its 5,000-word interview with the pornographic actor Stormy Daniels on Friday — more than six years after Trump's long-time attorney, Michael Cohen, sent an email to In Touch's general counsel saying Trump would aggressively pursue legal action if the story was printed, according to emails described to the AP by the former employees.

At the time, Trump was a reality TV star on the NBC show "The Apprentice."

The ex-employees spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because they were not permitted to discuss their former employer's editorial policies.

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, signed a source contract with the magazine, which said a friend and Clifford's ex-husband corroborated her account of a 2006 tryst. She also passed a lie detector test, the magazine said.

In the interview, Daniels claims she and Trump had a sexual encounter after meeting at a golf tournament in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, a year after Trump's marriage to his third wife, Melania.

Cohen has denied Trump had any relationship with Clifford. He didn't immediately return a message seeking comment Friday.

Last week, The Wall Street Journal reported that Cohen brokered a $130,000 payment to Daniels in October 2016 to prohibit her from publicly discussing the alleged affair before the presidential election. Other news organizations have since reported Clifford was in discussions with them about telling her story.

Cohen hasn't addressed his role negotiating the supposed payment, but provided the Journal a statement from "Stormy Daniels" in which she denied receiving any "hush money" from Trump.

A lawyer for Clifford, Keith Davidson, didn't return an email message seeking comment. In the statement provided by Cohen, Clifford called allegations of a sexual relationship with Trump "completely false."

It wasn't immediately clear why the magazine didn't publish its interview during the 2016 presidential campaign despite reminders from former employees that the transcript was still available in the company's networks, two former employees said.

A spokeswoman for In Touch, which is published by Bauer Media Group, claimed it only learned of its earlier interview after the Journal's report last week. She wouldn't comment on the magazine's decision not to publish in 2011.

Despite Clifford's first-person details on Trump, former employees said the decision not to run the story in 2011 was a justifiable business decision because at the time because Trump didn't have the same star appeal as more famous celebrities.

Cohen emailed In Touch's general counsel, Greg Welch, threatening to sue over the story in October 2011 — the same day Clifford's attorney sent a similar letter to Los Angeles-based blogger Nik Richie, who first posted Clifford's allegations to his website, The Dirty, according to emails provided by Richie.

___

Associated Press reporter Jeff Horwitz contributed to this story from Washington.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >