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Ward Chamberlin Jr., public broadcasting pioneer, dies at 95

Ward B. Chamberlin Jr., who pioneered public broadcasting, led stations in New York and Washington and helped launch the career of Oscar-nominated documentarian Ken Burns, has died from complications from dementia. He was 95.

His daughter, Lyn Chamberlin, confirmed Saturday to The Associated Press that her father died Thursday in Bedford, Massachusetts.

She says in a statement that her father was "a man of indomitable spirit, vision, and enormous compassion who touched everyone who ever met him."

Ward Chamberlin Jr. was born on August 4, 1921. He worked as the operating officer of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), and had a strong role in the creation of PBS and National Public Radio. He had held executive roles at WNET/Thirteen, American Playhouse, PBS and WETA.

Border agents ask Muhammad Ali's son: 'Are you Muslim?'

Returning from a Black History Month event in Jamaica, Muhammad Ali Jr. and his mother, Khalilah Camacho Ali, were pulled aside and separated from each other on Feb. 7 at the immigration checkpoint at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, said Chris Mancini, a family friend and attorney.

Camacho Ali was released a short time later after showing a photo of herself with her ex-husband, the former heavyweight boxing champion, Mancini said. But Ali Jr. was not carrying a photo of his world-famous father — a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Ali Jr., 44, who confirmed his Muslim faith, was detained about two hours, despite telling officials that he's Ali's son and a native-born U.S. citizen, Mancini said. It was the first time Ali Jr. and his mother have ever been asked if they're Muslim when re-entering the United States, he said.

"From the way they were treated, from what was said to them, they can come up with no other rational explanation except they fell into a profiling program run by customs, which is designed to obtain information from anyone who says they're a Muslim," Mancini said in a phone interview. "It's quite clear that what triggered his detention was his Arabic name and his religion."

U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Daniel Hetlage confirmed Saturday evening that Ali Jr. was held for questioning by customs officers, but said "it wasn't because he's a Muslim and it wasn't because of his Arabic-sounding name."

The agency said in a statement that its officers process more than 1.2 million international travelers daily with "vigilance and in accordance with the law." It said it does not discriminate based on religion, race, ethnicity or sexual orientation.

"We treat all travelers with respect and sensitivity," the agency said. "Integrity is our cornerstone. We are guided by the highest ethical and moral principles."

During his detention, Ali Jr. was asked repeatedly about his lineage and his name, "as if that was a pre-programmed question that was part of a profile," Mancini said.

Ali Jr. and his mother have been frequent global travelers. The family connects their treatment to President Donald Trump's efforts to restrict immigration after calling during his campaign for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

"This has never happened to them before," Mancini said. "They're asked specifically about their Arabic names. Where they got their names from and whether they're Muslims. It doesn't take much to connect those dots to what Trump is doing."

Camacho Ali and Ali Jr. live in Florida. They have not traveled abroad since, and are considering filing a federal lawsuit, he said.

Asked why the matter was just now coming to light, Mancini said: "Khalilah had prior commitments as did I and when she finally got in to see me for a legal opinion of what they did, I brought it to the media immediately."

Ali, the three-time heavyweight champion and humanitarian, died last June at age 74 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. People lined the streets of Louisville, Kentucky, to say goodbye to the city's most celebrated son before a star-studded memorial service watched worldwide.

___

This story has been corrected to "his" not "the" in border protection spokesman's quote.

A cadre of casually-clad stars come through Oscar rehearsals

Dwayne Johnson posed for a solo pic on the Dolby Theatre stage. Taraji P. Henson pretended to run off with the wooden prop Oscar. And a makeup-free, casually clad Halle Berry made a rehearsal actor's day when she kissed him on the cheek as he came onstage to accept an award.

"That's Halle Berry!" the actor said, eyes wide.

Saturday is rehearsal day for Sunday's Academy Awards, when a parade of superstar presenters comes through the Dolby Theatre to practice their lines — another famous face every 15 minutes. It's also casual day at the Dolby, as most stars come dressed down — except for the women's feet: Many actresses wear their show-day shoes to try them out on the Oscar stage.

Salma Hayek, however, was not dressed down. Wearing all black, from her blazer and blouse down to her stiletto-heeled boots, she looked like she just walked out of a magazine spread.

"OK, let's do this," she said from center stage.

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone had fun with a microphone sound-check. Stone asked the stage manager if they should begin reading their lines and was surprised to hear her voice amplified to the room.

"Hot mike," Gosling said, putting his mouth on the microphone.

"Sibilance," Stone responded, invoking an old "Wayne's World" sketch as she leaned into the mike.

"Sibilance," Gosling replied.

Judd Apatow accompanied wife Leslie Mann to her read-through, and he documented the experience with his cellphone. He shot photos of Mann on stage and took pictures of her seat-saving placard. He also helped write her script for Sunday.

"I think we're going to fix it up a little bit and practice for tomorrow," Mann told a stage manager.

Vince Vaughn also plans to pen a portion of his Sunday night script, he said from the stage Saturday.

Amy Adams brought a very special guest along to rehearsals: her 6-year-old daughter, Aviana. Mother and daughter also wore matching outfits: Gray sweatshirts with rainbow-striped sleeves that read "Good vibes only." Adams paired hers with skinny jeans and tall silver platform shoes.

When she finished her lines, her daughter came to meet her onstage, but nearly tripped on the way up.

"Her and Jennifer Lawrence, you know," Adams joked, referencing Lawrence's fall on her way to accept her Oscar in 2013.

"Fifty Shades of Grey" stars Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan looked out from the stage to try to find their seats in the theater, all marked by photo placards.

"Oh my God, I'm in the corner," she said, smiling at having found it. "I'm way in the corner."

"I'm probably up there," Dornan said, pointing up to the balcony. (He's actually seated near his co-star.)

Brie Larson wore an ACLU T-shirt under a denim jacket to rehearsals. Kate McKinnon paired black leggings and gray hoodie with towering black platforms, worn over socks. Samuel L. Jackson kept things relaxed, wearing a gray tracksuit and backward ball cap. He snapped a few cellphone photos of the stage after running through his lines. Scarlett Johansson didn't bother with heels. She wore clogs with her black pants and white moto jacket, and took a moment to admire the stage when she walked onto it.

"It's very beautiful," she said.

Jason Bateman was in a joking mood. When a stage manager told him not to read the teleprompter lines in red, Bateman replied, "I say it louder, right? That's why it's in red." David Oyelowo made rehearsals a family affair: his wife and four children sat in the theater as he rehearsed.

Other stars rehearsing Saturday included Jennifer Aniston, Chris Evans, Alicia Vikander, Felicity Jones and nominee Dev Patel, who confessed to a stage manager, "I'm very nervous."

But the presenters who had the most fun at rehearsals were the stars of "Hidden Figures." Henson and supporting actress nominee Octavia Spencer were all giggles onstage.

"I'd like to thank the academy for opening the curtains for such a grand entrance," Spencer said, putting on a British accent.

"It was my idea!" Henson shouted. "Right, academy?"

Their co-star Janelle Monae, who looked camera-ready in a colorblock sweater, stayed quiet.

"She's the straight man in this group," Henson told a stagehand. But not so straight that she wasn't willing to strike a "Charlie's Angels"-style pose with Henson and Spencer when the curtains opened to reveal the women onstage.

They practiced their entrance before presenting the prop Oscar. As Henson handed it to the fake winners, she said, "You're amazing. Hire me!"

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

A cadre of casually-clad stars come through Oscar rehearsals

Dwayne Johnson posed for a solo pic on the Dolby Theatre stage. Taraji P. Henson pretended to run off with the wooden prop Oscar. And a makeup-free, casually clad Halle Berry made a rehearsal actor's day when she kissed him on the cheek as he came onstage to accept an award.

"That's Halle Berry!" the actor said, eyes wide.

Saturday is rehearsal day for Sunday's Academy Awards, when a parade of superstar presenters comes through the Dolby Theatre to practice their lines — another famous face every 15 minutes. It's also casual day at the Dolby, as most stars come dressed down — except for the women's feet: Many actresses wear their show-day shoes to try them out on the Oscar stage.

Salma Hayek, however, was not dressed down. Wearing all black, from her blazer and blouse down to her stiletto-heeled boots, she looked like she just walked out of a magazine spread.

"OK, let's do this," she said from center stage.

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone had fun with a microphone sound-check. Stone asked the stage manager if they should begin reading their lines and was surprised to hear her voice amplified to the room.

"Hot mike," Gosling said, putting his mouth on the microphone.

"Sibilance," Stone responded, invoking an old "Wayne's World" sketch as she leaned into the mike.

"Sibilance," Gosling replied.

Judd Apatow accompanied wife Leslie Mann to her read-through, and he documented the experience with his cellphone. He shot photos of Mann on stage and took pictures of her seat-saving placard. He also helped write her script for Sunday.

"I think we're going to fix it up a little bit and practice for tomorrow," Mann told a stage manager.

Vince Vaughn also plans to pen a portion of his Sunday night script, he said from the stage Saturday.

Amy Adams brought a very special guest along to rehearsals: her 6-year-old daughter, Aviana. Mother and daughter also wore matching outfits: Gray sweatshirts with rainbow-striped sleeves that read "Good vibes only." Adams paired hers with skinny jeans and tall silver platform shoes.

When she finished her lines, her daughter came to meet her onstage, but nearly tripped on the way up.

"Her and Jennifer Lawrence, you know," Adams joked, referencing Lawrence's fall on her way to accept her Oscar in 2013.

"Fifty Shades of Grey" stars Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan looked out from the stage to try to find their seats in the theater, all marked by photo placards.

"Oh my God, I'm in the corner," she said, smiling at having found it. "I'm way in the corner."

"I'm probably up there," Dornan said, pointing up to the balcony. (He's actually seated near his co-star.)

Brie Larson wore an ACLU T-shirt under a denim jacket to rehearsals. Kate McKinnon paired black leggings and gray hoodie with towering black platforms, worn over socks. Samuel L. Jackson kept things relaxed, wearing a gray tracksuit and backward ball cap. He snapped a few cellphone photos of the stage after running through his lines. Scarlett Johansson didn't bother with heels. She wore clogs with her black pants and white moto jacket, and took a moment to admire the stage when she walked onto it.

"It's very beautiful," she said.

Jason Bateman was in a joking mood. When a stage manager told him not to read the teleprompter lines in red, Bateman replied, "I say it louder, right? That's why it's in red." David Oyelowo made rehearsals a family affair: his wife and four children sat in the theater as he rehearsed.

Other stars rehearsing Saturday included Jennifer Aniston, Chris Evans, Alicia Vikander, Felicity Jones and nominee Dev Patel, who confessed to a stage manager, "I'm very nervous."

But the presenters who had the most fun at rehearsals were the stars of "Hidden Figures." Henson and supporting actress nominee Octavia Spencer were all giggles onstage.

"I'd like to thank the academy for opening the curtains for such a grand entrance," Spencer said, putting on a British accent.

"It was my idea!" Henson shouted. "Right, academy?"

Their co-star Janelle Monae, who looked camera-ready in a colorblock sweater, stayed quiet.

"She's the straight man in this group," Henson told a stagehand. But not so straight that she wasn't willing to strike a "Charlie's Angels"-style pose with Henson and Spencer when the curtains opened to reveal the women onstage.

They practiced their entrance before presenting the prop Oscar. As Henson handed it to the fake winners, she said, "You're amazing. Hire me!"

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

'Hillary's America,' 'Batman v Superman' top Razzies

Neither Batman nor Dinesh D'Souza could finagle their way out of a Razzie.

The annual Golden Raspberry Awards bestowed a tying four "honors" to both D'Souza's documentary "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party" and the superhero blockbuster "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice."

D'Souza's film was named the worst picture of the year on Saturday, and the conservative author got both worst director (with co-director Bruce Schooley) and worst actor for playing himself. Worst actress went to Rebekah Turner who played Hillary Clinton.

"This is absolutely fantastic," said D'Souza in a video statement. "My audience loves the fact that you hate me. Thank you."

Not to be outdone, Zack Snyder's $250 million "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" also picked up four "wins" including worst remake, worst screenplay and worst screen combo for its dueling stars Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill. Jesse Eisenberg was also singled out as the worst supporting actor for his over-the-top portrayal of Superman baddie Lex Luthor.

Both films were widely panned by critics upon their release — D'Souza's film for being biased and sensationalist and Snyder's for its messiness. While D'Souza's outing is likely a one-time deal, there is more to come in the DC Comic Book Universe from Snyder whose "Justice League" hits theaters in Nov.

Another poorly received film, "Zoolander 2," got away with only one award, which went to Kristen Wiig for worst supporting actress.

The organization also bestowed the "redeemer" award to Mel Gibson, who was previously nominated for "The Expendables 3" and this year has climbed back up to the ranks to more prestigious awards. Gibson is nominated for a best director Oscar for his World War II film "Hacksaw Ridge."

The Razzie Awards are determined by around 1,000 voting Razzie members from 25 countries, while Worst Screen Combo was voted on by "thousands" through a Rotten Tomatoes partnership.

___

Online:

http://www.razzies.com

'Hillary's America,' 'Batman v Superman' top Razzies

Neither Batman nor Dinesh D'Souza could finagle their way out of a Razzie.

The annual Golden Raspberry Awards bestowed a tying four "honors" to both D'Souza's documentary "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party" and the superhero blockbuster "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice."

D'Souza's film was named the worst picture of the year on Saturday, and the conservative author got both worst director (with co-director Bruce Schooley) and worst actor for playing himself. Worst actress went to Rebekah Turner who played Hillary Clinton.

"This is absolutely fantastic," said D'Souza in a video statement. "My audience loves the fact that you hate me. Thank you."

Not to be outdone, Zack Snyder's $250 million "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" also picked up four "wins" including worst remake, worst screenplay and worst screen combo for its dueling stars Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill. Jesse Eisenberg was also singled out as the worst supporting actor for his over-the-top portrayal of Superman baddie Lex Luthor.

Both films were widely panned by critics upon their release — D'Souza's film for being biased and sensationalist and Snyder's for its messiness. While D'Souza's outing is likely a one-time deal, there is more to come in the DC Comic Book Universe from Snyder whose "Justice League" hits theaters in Nov.

Another poorly received film, "Zoolander 2," got away with only one award, which went to Kristen Wiig for worst supporting actress.

The organization also bestowed the "redeemer" award to Mel Gibson, who was previously nominated for "The Expendables 3" and this year has climbed back up to the ranks to more prestigious awards. Gibson is nominated for a best director Oscar for his World War II film "Hacksaw Ridge."

The Razzie Awards are determined by around 1,000 voting Razzie members from 25 countries, while Worst Screen Combo was voted on by "thousands" through a Rotten Tomatoes partnership.

___

Online:

http://www.razzies.com

Syrian who worked on nominated film can't attend Oscars

U.S. immigration authorities are barring entry to a 21-year-old Syrian cinematographer who worked on a harrowing film about his nation's civil war, "The White Helmets," that has been nominated for an Academy Award.

According to internal Trump administration correspondence seen by The Associated Press, the Department of Homeland Security has decided at the last minute to block Khaled Khateeb from traveling to Los Angeles for the Oscars.

Khateeb was scheduled to arrive Saturday in Los Angeles on a Turkish Airlines flight departing from Istanbul. But his plans have been upended after U.S. officials reported finding "derogatory information" regarding Khateeb.

Derogatory information is a broad category that can include anything from terror connections to passport irregularities. Asked for comment, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, Gillian Christensen, said, "A valid travel document is required for travel to the United States."

"The White Helmets," a 40-minute Netflix documentary, has been nominated for Best Documentary Short. If the film wins the Oscar, the award would go to director Orlando von Einsiedel and producer Joanna Natasegara. Khateeb is one of three people credited for cinematography; Franklin Dow is the film's director of photography.

The film focuses on the rescue workers who risk their lives to save Syrians affected by civil war. Many of the group's members have been killed by Syrian President Bashar Assad's air forces. The group also was nominated for last year's Nobel Peace Prize.

"The White Helmets" includes emblematic scenes of the deadly 6-year-old conflict: people digging through destroyed homes looking for survivors, at constant risk of "double tap" attacks that target first responders after they've arrived at the scene of a strike.

Khateeb had been issued a visa to attend the ceremony with Hollywood's biggest stars. But Turkish authorities detained him this week, according to the internal U.S. government correspondence, and he suddenly needed a passport waiver from the United States to enter the country.

Reached by telephone, Khateeb said he was currently in Istanbul and had not been detained. He declined to speak further about his situation. And a posting on the White Helmets' Twitter account said that "sadly," Khateen would not be able to attend the Oscars. "Not allowed to leave Turkey because passport not issued by Damascus," according to the tweet.

The correspondence indicated he would not receive such a waiver. There was no explanation in the correspondence for why Turkey detained Khateeb.

___

Associated Press writer Sarah El Deeb in Beirut contributed to this report.

Five facts about Sunday's 89th Annual Academy Awards

Five facts about Sunday's 89th Annual Academy Awards:

IT'S AN HONOR TO BE NOMINATED: But after 21 nominations, it would be nice for sound mixer Kevin O'Connell to finally win. The most nominated artist without a win, O'Connell has another chance this year for his work in "Hacksaw Ridge."

#NOTSOWHITE: This is the first time in Oscars' 89-year history that black performers were nominated in all acting categories. There were no black acting nominees in 2016 and 2015. A record four black directors are nominated in the documentary feature category. And for the 84th time in Oscar history, no women were nominated for best director.

HOST WITH THE MOST: It's Jimmy Kimmel's first time hosting the Academy Awards, though he's handled the Emmy Awards twice. Bob Hope hosted the most Oscar shows with 19 appearances.

MORE MOVIES: There were more movies potentially in the Oscar mix this year. The film academy reports that 336 feature films were eligible for best picture this year, compared to 305 last year. Eighty-five countries submitted foreign language film entries.

PRESS HERE: The Oscars are broadcast around the globe, and reporters from all over the world come to Hollywood to take on the task. The film academy has issued more than 1,600 press credentials for the 89th annual Academy Awards. Stars arriving on the red carpet will be posing for more than 70 photographers.

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

Song and dance, protest and politics to mingle at Oscars

The 89th Academy Awards show promises to be equal parts pomp and politics.

The only thing expected to take the stage more often than the frothy front-runner "La La Land" at Sunday's ceremony is protest (and probably some punchlines) over the policies of President Donald Trump. For largely liberal Hollywood, his election has proven a rallying cause-celebre throughout an awards season that has otherwise been a parade of honors for Damien Chazelle's celebrated musical.

Just how political things are going to get at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles may be the biggest question of Sunday night's show, to be broadcast by ABC beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST, with red carpet coverage starting earlier. The current forecast for Sunday is only a slight chance of rain, though the inside of the Dolby Theatre is expected to be far stormier.

Even the usually glitzy lead-up to Sunday's show has taken on the form of a gathering tempest. On Friday, the United Talent Agency, forgoing its usual Oscar party, instead held a rally over immigration. "We will not tolerate chaos and ineptitude and war-mongering," Jodie Foster told attendees.

More strikingly, the six directors of the foreign film nominees on Friday released a joint statement condemning "the climate of fanaticism and nationalism we see today in the U.S. and in so many other countries, in parts of the population and, most unfortunately of all, among leading politicians."

The signees included the Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, whose "The Salesman" is favored to win him his second foreign language Oscar. He isn't attending the awards out of protest for Trump's proposed travel ban from seven predominantly Muslim nations, including Iran.

On Friday, he posted a video thanking the Hollywood community for its support of his Oscar boycott. In it, Farhadi condemned Trump's policies and said they are "trying to promote hate."

And sure to stoke the rhetoric at Sunday's Oscars is news this weekend that U.S. immigration authorities are barring entry to a 21-year-old Syrian cinematographer who worked on the documentary short nominee "The White Helmets," about the nation's civil war.

Meanwhile, about 20 Trump supporters gathered Saturday at an intersection near the Dolby Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. One held a sign with Trump's signature slogan, "Make America Great Again," while another sign asked motorists to honk if they supported Trump. There were few honks.

Some Trump supporters are calling for a boycott of the broadcast, expecting more speeches like Meryl Streep's fiery remarks at the Globes — which prompted Trump to call her "overrated." (The Academy of Motion Pictures on Friday added Streep, also a nominee, to its presenters.) But similar so-called boycotts have also trailed the Broadway sensation "Hamilton" and 2016's top box-office hit, the "Star Wars" spinoff "Rogue One."

ABC would be very happy with similar results, especially after last year's telecast, hosted by Chris Rock, drew 34.4 million viewers, an eight-year low. Ads this year are still going for $2.1 million for 30-second spots.

Host Jimmy Kimmel will have a delicate balance on his hands. Play it too light and he'll appear out of sync with the mood. Hammer too hard and he'll alienate viewers already inundated by politics.

A lot of the suspense has been deflated by the juggernaut of "La La Land," the Golden Globe winner and favorite to win best picture. It's up for 14 awards, tying it with "Titanic" and "All About Eve" for the record.

Rock's 2016 show, which he introduced as "the White People's Choice Awards," was rife with Hollywood's diversity debate. But after two straight years of all-white acting nominees and the resulting "OscarsSoWhite" rancor, this year's field is teaming with African-American actors and filmmakers, thanks to films like best-picture candidates Barry Jenkin's coming-of-age tale "Moonlight," Denzel Washington's August Wilson adaptation "Fences" and Theodore Melfi's uplifting space-race drama "Hidden Figures."

For the first time, an actor of color is nominated in each acting category. A record six black actors are nominated. Four of the five films nominated for best documentary were made by black filmmakers. Bradford Young ("Arrival") is the second black cinematographer ever nominated. Kimberly Steward, the financer of "Manchester by the Sea," is the second black female producer nominated for best picture.

The nominees follow the efforts by Academy of Motions Pictures Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs to diversify the membership of the largely white, older and male film academy. In June, the academy added 683 new members: 46 percent of them were female; 41-percent were nonwhite; and they pulled from 59 countries.

There is other turmoil, too. Only one major studio — Paramount, which distributed "Arrival" and "Fences" — scored a best picture nod this year — and its chief, Brad Grey, departed last week. Amazon, on the other hand, scored its first best-picture nomination with "Manchester by the Sea."

___

Nekesa Mumbi Moody contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Song and dance, protest and politics to mingle at Oscars

The 89th Academy Awards show promises to be equal parts pomp and politics.

The only thing expected to take the stage more often than the frothy front-runner "La La Land" at Sunday's ceremony is protest (and probably some punchlines) over the policies of President Donald Trump. For largely liberal Hollywood, his election has proven a rallying cause-celebre throughout an awards season that has otherwise been a parade of honors for Damien Chazelle's celebrated musical.

Just how political things are going to get at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles may be the biggest question of Sunday night's show, to be broadcast by ABC beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST, with red carpet coverage starting earlier. The current forecast for Sunday is only a slight chance of rain, though the inside of the Dolby Theatre is expected to be far stormier.

Even the usually glitzy lead-up to Sunday's show has taken on the form of a gathering tempest. On Friday, the United Talent Agency, forgoing its usual Oscar party, instead held a rally over immigration. "We will not tolerate chaos and ineptitude and war-mongering," Jodie Foster told attendees.

More strikingly, the six directors of the foreign film nominees on Friday released a joint statement condemning "the climate of fanaticism and nationalism we see today in the U.S. and in so many other countries, in parts of the population and, most unfortunately of all, among leading politicians."

The signees included the Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, whose "The Salesman" is favored to win him his second foreign language Oscar. He isn't attending the awards out of protest for Trump's proposed travel ban from seven predominantly Muslim nations, including Iran.

On Friday, he posted a video thanking the Hollywood community for its support of his Oscar boycott. In it, Farhadi condemned Trump's policies and said they are "trying to promote hate."

And sure to stoke the rhetoric at Sunday's Oscars is news this weekend that U.S. immigration authorities are barring entry to a 21-year-old Syrian cinematographer who worked on the documentary short nominee "The White Helmets," about the nation's civil war.

Meanwhile, about 20 Trump supporters gathered Saturday at an intersection near the Dolby Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. One held a sign with Trump's signature slogan, "Make America Great Again," while another sign asked motorists to honk if they supported Trump. There were few honks.

Some Trump supporters are calling for a boycott of the broadcast, expecting more speeches like Meryl Streep's fiery remarks at the Globes — which prompted Trump to call her "overrated." (The Academy of Motion Pictures on Friday added Streep, also a nominee, to its presenters.) But similar so-called boycotts have also trailed the Broadway sensation "Hamilton" and 2016's top box-office hit, the "Star Wars" spinoff "Rogue One."

ABC would be very happy with similar results, especially after last year's telecast, hosted by Chris Rock, drew 34.4 million viewers, an eight-year low. Ads this year are still going for $2.1 million for 30-second spots.

Host Jimmy Kimmel will have a delicate balance on his hands. Play it too light and he'll appear out of sync with the mood. Hammer too hard and he'll alienate viewers already inundated by politics.

A lot of the suspense has been deflated by the juggernaut of "La La Land," the Golden Globe winner and favorite to win best picture. It's up for 14 awards, tying it with "Titanic" and "All About Eve" for the record.

Rock's 2016 show, which he introduced as "the White People's Choice Awards," was rife with Hollywood's diversity debate. But after two straight years of all-white acting nominees and the resulting "OscarsSoWhite" rancor, this year's field is teaming with African-American actors and filmmakers, thanks to films like best-picture candidates Barry Jenkin's coming-of-age tale "Moonlight," Denzel Washington's August Wilson adaptation "Fences" and Theodore Melfi's uplifting space-race drama "Hidden Figures."

For the first time, an actor of color is nominated in each acting category. A record six black actors are nominated. Four of the five films nominated for best documentary were made by black filmmakers. Bradford Young ("Arrival") is the second black cinematographer ever nominated. Kimberly Steward, the financer of "Manchester by the Sea," is the second black female producer nominated for best picture.

The nominees follow the efforts by Academy of Motions Pictures Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs to diversify the membership of the largely white, older and male film academy. In June, the academy added 683 new members: 46 percent of them were female; 41-percent were nonwhite; and they pulled from 59 countries.

There is other turmoil, too. Only one major studio — Paramount, which distributed "Arrival" and "Fences" — scored a best picture nod this year — and its chief, Brad Grey, departed last week. Amazon, on the other hand, scored its first best-picture nomination with "Manchester by the Sea."

___

Nekesa Mumbi Moody contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

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