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What Happened to the Survivors of the Lynyrd Skynyrd Plane Crash?

During the decades since Lynyrd Skynyrd's horrific 1977 plane crash, some initial survivors have passed away, while others did their best to endure.

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The Latest: Lawyer says actress accusing Weinstein is scared

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Latest on sexual harassment and abuse allegations against Harvey Weinstein (all times local):

1:30 p.m.

The Los Angeles lawyer for an Italian actress who has accused Harvey Weinstein of rape says it has had a "humongous impact on her life" and she is extremely scared.

Attorney David M. Ring told reporters Friday that his client met Weinstein briefly at the L.A. Italia film festival in 2013 and he bullied his way into her hotel room.

Ring says that she gave Los Angeles police detectives a description of sexual assault and rape.

The attorney says the actress has had no interaction with Weinstein since then.

Weinstein's representative has denied the Oscar-winner had non-consensual sex with any woman.

___

12:05 p.m.

A former television and stage actress says Harvey Weinstein ruined her career ambition after he exposed himself to her during a meeting in 1989.

Speaking at a Friday press conference with attorney Gloria Allred, Heather Kerr said that she been working in the office of an entertainment business manager and sometimes answered the phones. Weinstein was a frequent caller and at one point he suggested they meet at an office in Westwood. After she arrived, he told her to sit on the couch, sat next to her and kept telling her she needed to be "good" if she wanted to succeed. He then pulled down his zipper and exposed himself.

Kerr says she backed away from him, left the room and hurried out of the building. After some theater work, she quit acting. "I felt so powerless," she tearfully recalled. Her acting credits in the 1980s include the TV shows "The Facts of Life" and "Mama's Family."

Weinstein is facing criminal charges in three cities after allegations of rape and sexual assault.

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10:10 a.m.

The Television Academy says it has voted to begin disciplinary proceedings against disgraced film mogul Harvey Weinstein.

The academy's board of governors issued a statement Friday declaring that "sexual harassment in any form is abhorrent and totally unacceptable."

The academy, which bestows the Emmy awards, said a hearing has been set for November to consider "action up to and including termination of academy membership."

Weinstein has recently been accused of multiple acts of sexual harassment and assault spanning decades. He has been fired from The Weinstein Co., a TV and movie film production company he co-founded with his brother Bob. He already has been expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Producers Guild and the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

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5:30 a.m.

A group of staffers for the company co-founded by Harvey Weinstein have spoken out about the allegations of decades of sexual conduct against the media mogul by signing a letter stating they didn't know they were "working for a serial sexual predator."

The anonymous letter signed simply by "Select Members of The Weinstein Company Staff" was published online by The New Yorker on Thursday. In a separate story, the magazine says the letter was penned by about 30 Weinstein employees.

The employees say they knew of Weinstein's "infamous temper" and that he could be "manipulative," but didn't know "that he used his power to systematically assault and silence women."

Representatives for Weinstein and The Weinstein Company didn't immediately return a request for comment Friday.

___

3 a.m.

An attorney says he will detail allegations by an Italian actress and model who has told police disgraced film mogul Harvey Weinstein raped her in a Los Angeles hotel room in 2013.

David M. Ring is expected to address reporters outside a downtown Los Angeles courthouse on Friday afternoon. A news release announcing the press conference confirms several details included a Los Angeles Times report about the police investigation, including that the woman spoke to detectives in an interview on Thursday.

Police have confirmed they are investigating but have not released any further details.

The woman was not named in the Times story or the announcement of Ring's press conference.

Weinstein's representative has denied the Oscar-winner had non-consensual sex with any woman.

TV Academy votes to consider expelling Harvey Weinstein

NEW YORK (AP) — The Television Academy says it has voted to begin disciplinary proceedings against disgraced film mogul Harvey Weinstein.

The academy's board of governors issued a statement Friday declaring that "sexual harassment in any form is abhorrent and totally unacceptable."

The academy, which bestows the Emmy awards, said a hearing has been set for November to consider "action up to and including termination of academy membership."

Weinstein has recently been accused of multiple acts of sexual harassment and assault spanning decades. He has been fired from The Weinstein Co., a TV and movie film production company he co-founded with his brother Bob. He already has been expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Producers Guild and the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

Hear REO Speedwagon's New Version of 'I Believe in Santa Claus'

REO Speedwagon will celebrate the holiday season this year with a remastered and expanded edition of their 2009 holiday album 'Not So Silent Night.'

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This Day in Rock History: October 20

40 years ago today, the tragic Lynyrd Skynyrd plane crash. -English Nick

Prominent chefs oppose baker in major gay rights case

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prominent chefs, bakers and restaurant owners want the Supreme Court to rule against a Colorado baker who wouldn't make a cake for a same-sex couple's wedding.

The food makers say that once they open their doors for business, they don't get to choose their customers. They say that abiding by laws that bar discrimination based on sexual orientation does not strip them of creative control of a dish or a pastry.

Celebrity chefs Jose Andres, Elizabeth Falkner and Carla Hall, the owners of a popular Washington, D.C., cupcake shop and a small-town baker from Mississippi are among those who are signing onto a legal brief being written by the Human Rights Campaign.

Cake artists who want the justices to recognize the artistic expression in cake-baking filed a separate brief last month that does not take sides in the case.

The case pits the rights of a gay couple against baker Jack Phillips' religious objections to same-sex marriage. The case will be argued on Dec. 5.

Phillips owns the Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban Denver. In 2012, he told Charlie Craig and David Mullins that he would not make a cake for a same-sex wedding.

The couple complained to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission that Phillips violated the state's anti-discrimination law. Phillips lost at every step in the legal process before the Supreme Court agreed in June to hear his case.

While Phillips' religious beliefs about same-sex marriage underlie the case, the main argument he is making at the Supreme Court is that, as an artist, he cannot be compelled to create a cake at odds with his views.

The chefs, bakers and restaurateurs who are part of the Human Rights Campaign effort say that anti-discrimination laws in Colorado and 21 other states are reasonable regulations that don't stifle their artistic creativity.

"It's not about your art. When you're open to service to people, you can't decide who to serve and not serve," said Falkner, who has owned restaurants in New York and San Francisco and been both a contestant and judge on cooking competitions.

Mary Jennifer Russell, owner of Sugaree's Bakery in New Albany, Mississippi, said, "I can decide what to create and what to serve, but not to say I won't serve it to a gay person, or a transgender person or a woman or a person of color."

Sophie Kallinis LaMontagne, a co-owner of Washington's Georgetown Cupcake, said she and her sister, Katherine Kallinis Berman, want the Supreme Court to hear from bakers and chefs "why we believe it's so important that they don't allow businesses to discriminate. This is about doing the right thing and welcoming all."

Last month, 11 cake artists submitted a brief that looked almost good enough to eat. It contained dozens of pictures of extravagant and finely detailed cakes, including multitiered cakes for same-sex weddings.

The point of the brief was to show that the cakes are works of art and are entitled to the same constitutional protection as artworks in other mediums.

The cake artists do not call for the court to rule one way or another, but their argument fits nicely with the one being advanced by Phillips.

35 Years Ago: Hall and Oates Sharpen Their Sound on 'H2O'

Hall and Oates shifted focus to the mechanized '80s zeitgeist on 'H20,' building on the long-hoped-for fame they'd earlier achieved with a turn toward sleek New Wave.

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John McCain memoir, 'The Restless Wave,' coming in April

NEW YORK (AP) — An upcoming memoir from Sen. John McCain has taken on new meaning since he first decided to write it.

"The Restless Wave: Good Times, Just Causes, Great Fights, and Other Appreciations" is scheduled to come out in April, Simon & Schuster told The Associated Press on Friday. The publisher quietly signed up the book in February, without any formal announcement. In July, McCain disclosed he had been diagnosed with brain cancer and last month he said the prognosis was "very poor."

McCain, 81, was re-elected to a sixth term in the Senate in 2016.

"This memoir will be about what matters most to him, and I hope it will be regarded as the work of an American hero," said Jonathan Karp, president and publisher of Simon & Schuster's flagship imprint.

The book is expected to begin in 2008, when the Arizona Republican lost to Barack Obama in the presidential election, and will include his "no-holds-barred opinions" on last year's campaign and on current events in Washington. McCain has been a sharp critic of President Donald Trump, a fellow Republican, and was a key opponent last summer of GOP efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Earlier this week, McCain denounced "half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems," remarks widely taken as criticism of Trump and such allies as former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon.

"Candid, pragmatic, and always fascinating, John McCain holds nothing back in his latest memoir," according to the publisher.

The memoir already has a notable change: The original title was "It's Always Darkest Before It's Totally Black," an expression McCain likes to cite.

"The Restless Wave" reunites him with longtime collaborator Mark Salter and with Karp, his longtime editor. The three worked together on McCain's million-selling "Faith of My Fathers," which came out in 1999, and on such subsequent releases as "Worth the Fighting For" and "Why Courage Matters."

In a recent email, Salter told the AP that there was "still a ways to go" before the book's completion, but that McCain was "hard at it." The original focus was "on international issues, his experiences overseas and movements and people he's supported over the years."

"There will still be examples of that in the book, but it will be a little more expansive and reflective about his career and life, the direction of our politics and our leadership in the world, and the causes and values that matter most to him," Salter wrote. "The original title was an old joke he employed often over the years. But the Senator thought it was too flip for some of the subjects he now wants to address."

For Karp, "The Restless Wave" is a poignant, painful reminder of a previous book he edited: "True Compass," by McCain's good friend Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. As with the McCain book, Karp signed up Kennedy's memoir before he was diagnosed with brain cancer. Kennedy died in August 2009, just weeks before "True Compass" was published.

"Both men represent the best of leadership," Karp said. "Both men have been giants of the Senate who demonstrated an ability to work across the aisle in a truly admirable way."

Taylor Swift is ‘Gorgeous’ as new song is released online

Taylor Swift is lighting up the web again with the third song from her upcoming “Reputation” album.

>> Read more trending news

Swift dropped the song “Gorgeous” Friday morning, Billboard reported.

She teased the release Thursday on Instagram.

A lyric video was released at midnight on YouTube of “Gorgeous” and it quickly shot up to number one on iTunes.

Fans took to social media shortly after the song’s release.

“Gorgeous” comes after “...Ready For It” and “Look What You Made Me Do.”

Her album, “Reputation” is scheduled to be released on Nov. 10.

E! cancels Joan Rivers' 'Fashion Police' after 22-year run

LOS ANGELES (AP) — E!'s long-running series, "Fashion Police," will come to an end next month with a special finale featuring its late host and co-creator Joan Rivers.

The series began in 1995 and became a staple on the red carpet at major awards shows with Rivers commentating on celebrity looks. It continued after Rivers' 2014 death with her daughter, Melissa, as a co-host.

The network says "Fashion Police: The Farewell" will look back at memorable moments from the show's 22-year run and include surprise celebrity guests. Footage from an unaired 80's themed episode featuring Joan Rivers will also be shown.

"Fashion Police: The Farewell" airs on Nov. 27.

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