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Watch: Dog appears to dance to music at groomer

An Orlando pet salon uploaded a video to its Facebook page of an adorable dog that appears to dance to salsa music.

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In the brief clip, uploaded Jan. 12, the dog can be seen rising to its hind legs and dancing around to "Conga" by the Miami Sound Machine. It's famously led by singer Gloria Estefan.

 When you had such a fun time at your groomers, you can't help but do the #congo 💃🎶 407.442.7297 www.plushpawsinc.com #plushpawspetsalon #doggroomer #downtownorlando #orlandobusiness #supportlocal #orlandosbest #smallbusiness #dancingdog #plushpaws #doggrooming #orlandoliving #collegeparkfl #petgrooming #petlover #animallovers #doglover #petsalon #orlando #florida #petsofinstagram #rescuedog #rescuedogsofinstagram #savedontshop #gloriaestefan #terriersofinstagram #terrier Petoftheday #instamood #instagram #youtube #salsadancingPosted by Plush Paws Pet Salon on Thursday, January 12, 2017

The footage of the dog seemingly dancing the conga was shot at the Plush Paws Pet Salon.

"When you had such a fun time at your groomers, you can't help but do the (conga)," the pet salon wrote in the Facebook post.

Woody Harrelson jokes about new role in Star Wars spinoff

Woody Harrelson recently confirmed he's playing Han Solo's mentor in the next "Star Wars" movie, but the actor jokes about his own ability to lead.

"I wouldn't choose me," the actor shrugged and then laughed at the premiere of "Wilson" at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Harrelson will play Garris Shrike. He also said the movie, which doesn't yet have a title, begins shooting in March.

It also stars Aiden Ehrenreich as Han Solo. Donald Glover will play Lando Calrissian and Emilia Clarke has been cast as well but in an unknown role. The movie is scheduled to come out in May 2018.

As for "Wilson," it's adapted from a graphic novel of the same name about a curmudgeon, played by Harrelson, who reconnects with his long lost ex-wife, played by Laura Dern, and discovers they have a daughter he didn't know about.

Dern also walked "Wilson's" red carpet on Sunday; a day earlier, she participated in the Women's March in Park City.

"I feel hopeful with the daily reminder that we peacefully protest, that we believe in our own internal revolution, that we honor our constitution and human rights which are women's rights and civil rights," she said.

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Online:

http://www.sundance.org

Woody Harrelson jokes about new role in Star Wars spinoff

Woody Harrelson recently confirmed he's playing Han Solo's mentor in the next "Star Wars" movie, but the actor jokes about his own ability to lead.

"I wouldn't choose me," the actor shrugged and then laughed at the premiere of "Wilson" at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Harrelson will play Garris Shrike. He also said the movie, which doesn't yet have a title, begins shooting in March.

It also stars Aiden Ehrenreich as Han Solo. Donald Glover will play Lando Calrissian and Emilia Clarke has been cast as well but in an unknown role. The movie is scheduled to come out in May 2018.

As for "Wilson," it's adapted from a graphic novel of the same name about a curmudgeon, played by Harrelson, who reconnects with his long lost ex-wife, played by Laura Dern, and discovers they have a daughter he didn't know about.

Dern also walked "Wilson's" red carpet on Sunday; a day earlier, she participated in the Women's March in Park City.

"I feel hopeful with the daily reminder that we peacefully protest, that we believe in our own internal revolution, that we honor our constitution and human rights which are women's rights and civil rights," she said.

___

Online:

http://www.sundance.org

Vince Neil 'Terminated' From 'Celebrity Apprentice'

A week after winning over $750,000 for charity on 'Celebrity Apprentice,' Vince Neil fell on his own sword and was "terminated" on the first of tonight's two challenges. Continue reading…

South Dakota museum awarded ownership of Presley guitar

A federal judge ruled Monday that a South Dakota museum is the legal owner of a guitar played by Elvis Presley.

The Martin D-35 guitar has been on display at the National Music Museum in Vermillion since 2013. It had been donated by collector and musician Robert Johnson (not the legendary blues artist). But months later, Tennessee-based collector Larry Moss contacted the museum saying he was the rightful owner and the donor was not in a position to give away the guitar.

The National Music Museum asked a judge in July 2014 to declare it the legal owner of the guitar.

A judge ruled Monday that Moss never owned the title, never possessed the guitar and never paid for it, and didn't take legal action during his three-year wait for the instrument. The museum received the guitar's title in 2013 and is the legal owner, the court found.

Presley played the guitar during his 1977 tour and gave it to a fan in St. Petersburg, Florida, when it was damaged. Presley died six months later.

"We are elated to receive this judgment on the guitar," National Music Museum Director Cleveland Johnson said in a statement. "We're thrilled that our passionate commitment to it will ensure that it stays at the NMM for the enjoyment of our future visitors. We are the most suited to the guitar's safeguarding and physical preservation. It's in the best hands."

Kerry Washington calls on women to support women at Sundance

Olivia Pope gets a lot of credit for being a powerful woman, but it's the woman behind the fictional character who is helping to create real change in an industry that's woefully lacking in women and people of color behind the camera. Kerry Washington on Monday spoke to a group of women at the Sundance Film Festival's annual Women in Film Brunch, telling guests that progress is going to take "courage on all of our parts."

"Sometimes the people who are in charge of those rooms, they want us to feel lucky to be in the room. And we are because we're all really blessed to be doing what we do ... but that doesn't mean that I don't get to bring other people with me," Washington said. "Being alone in the room is exhausting ... you feel like you have to stand up for the entire gender or race."

Speaking with "Manchester by the Sea" producer Kimberly Steward, both women agreed that in order for the system to change, women have to support other women. It's what brought the two together in the first place. Washington remembered reading a profile of Steward, who mentioned Washington as a woman she admired in the business.

"A woman who shouts out other women? That's just something we all have to do," Washington said.

Washington has, in her stead as a producer of things like the HBO movie "Confirmation," has made it a priority to hire other women, people of color and people of the LGBTQ community to work on their sets.

"(It's) making sure people in society who we've labeled as other have a seat at the table," she said.

Earlier in the event, Caroline Libresco, who heads up Women at Sundance, said they'd found the main obstacles to women getting jobs behind the camera were "access to and knowledge of financing" and "male dominated networks."

Steward said that producers have to be willing to take more risks, too, while Washington chimed in that it's not a risk to make movies for and about women and people of color.

"Why do we allow this myth of risk to remain?" Washington asked. "And if it doesn't work, who cares? So many movies don't work."

___

This story corrects spelling of Olivia Pope's first name.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Kerry Washington calls on women to support women at Sundance

Olivia Pope gets a lot of credit for being a powerful woman, but it's the woman behind the fictional character who is helping to create real change in an industry that's woefully lacking in women and people of color behind the camera. Kerry Washington on Monday spoke to a group of women at the Sundance Film Festival's annual Women in Film Brunch, telling guests that progress is going to take "courage on all of our parts."

"Sometimes the people who are in charge of those rooms, they want us to feel lucky to be in the room. And we are because we're all really blessed to be doing what we do ... but that doesn't mean that I don't get to bring other people with me," Washington said. "Being alone in the room is exhausting ... you feel like you have to stand up for the entire gender or race."

Speaking with "Manchester by the Sea" producer Kimberly Steward, both women agreed that in order for the system to change, women have to support other women. It's what brought the two together in the first place. Washington remembered reading a profile of Steward, who mentioned Washington as a woman she admired in the business.

"A woman who shouts out other women? That's just something we all have to do," Washington said.

Washington has, in her stead as a producer of things like the HBO movie "Confirmation," has made it a priority to hire other women, people of color and people of the LGBTQ community to work on their sets.

"(It's) making sure people in society who we've labeled as other have a seat at the table," she said.

Earlier in the event, Caroline Libresco, who heads up Women at Sundance, said they'd found the main obstacles to women getting jobs behind the camera were "access to and knowledge of financing" and "male dominated networks."

Steward said that producers have to be willing to take more risks, too, while Washington chimed in that it's not a risk to make movies for and about women and people of color.

"Why do we allow this myth of risk to remain?" Washington asked. "And if it doesn't work, who cares? So many movies don't work."

___

This story corrects spelling of Olivia Pope's first name.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Minnesota author Kelly Barnhill wins Newbery Medal

Before winning the most prestigious prize in children's literature, Kelly Barnhill took a little detour.

Barnhill, named Monday as this year's winner of the John Newbery Medal for her fantasy novel "The Girl Who Drank the Moon," started writing children's stories in her late 20s — after two kids and a yearslong hiatus from the craft she studied as an undergraduate.

"I was doing all the wacky stuff that early 20s people did," Barnhill said in a telephone interview. "I worked for the National Park Service, I got trained as a volunteer firefighter, I went to Florida for a little while, I fell in love, I had my first baby when I was 25 and moved back to Minnesota, got my teaching license and was really not writing at all during that time."

She said she wasn't "drawn back to the page" until after she had her second baby girl and began making a dent in a stack of library books, starting with "The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse" by Louise Erdrich.

"That book unlocked something in me and I've been writing ever since," she said.

Barnhill started with short stories, which eventually turned into children's novels, including the coming-of-age tale "The Girl Who Drank the Moon" and her other critically acclaimed book "The Witch's Boy." Most of her stories start with a sticky conundrum or some sort of fundamental question, she said.

"The Girl Who Drank the Moon" started with Barnhill examining how narratives can be manipulated and true stories can be changed into falsehoods. The book is set in a town where the villagers sacrifice a newborn baby each year to a witch because they fear her. But the witch is secretly good and brings those babies to loving families in a town on the other side of the woods.

"This notion of rumor spreading and of getting the wrong idea about a person," she said, "that's like real stuff for these kids, that's what their life is like right now."

These days, the mother of three teaches in Minneapolis for COMPAS, a statewide nonprofit arts education organization. The Newbery award comes after her book was a New York Times bestseller; movie rights were sold in the fall to Fox Animation.

Barnhill said the most rewarding part of being a children's author is discussing the book with kids.

"It's particularly fun when I go someplace where the kids have already read the book. It's amazing how deep of thinkers they are," she said.

Minnesotan author Kate DiCamillo, who won the Newbery Medal winner for her book "The Tale of Despereaux," said she was delighted by Barnhill's win.

Asked what sets apart Barnhill's work, DiCamillo said: "It's that heart. And the imagination. And the courage to ask big questions."

Minnesota author Kelly Barnhill wins Newbery Medal

Before winning the most prestigious prize in children's literature, Kelly Barnhill took a little detour.

Barnhill, named Monday as this year's winner of the John Newbery Medal for her fantasy novel "The Girl Who Drank the Moon," started writing children's stories in her late 20s — after two kids and a yearslong hiatus from the craft she studied as an undergraduate.

"I was doing all the wacky stuff that early 20s people did," Barnhill said in a telephone interview. "I worked for the National Park Service, I got trained as a volunteer firefighter, I went to Florida for a little while, I fell in love, I had my first baby when I was 25 and moved back to Minnesota, got my teaching license and was really not writing at all during that time."

She said she wasn't "drawn back to the page" until after she had her second baby girl and began making a dent in a stack of library books, starting with "The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse" by Louise Erdrich.

"That book unlocked something in me and I've been writing ever since," she said.

Barnhill started with short stories, which eventually turned into children's novels, including the coming-of-age tale "The Girl Who Drank the Moon" and her other critically acclaimed book "The Witch's Boy." Most of her stories start with a sticky conundrum or some sort of fundamental question, she said.

"The Girl Who Drank the Moon" started with Barnhill examining how narratives can be manipulated and true stories can be changed into falsehoods. The book is set in a town where the villagers sacrifice a newborn baby each year to a witch because they fear her. But the witch is secretly good and brings those babies to loving families in a town on the other side of the woods.

"This notion of rumor spreading and of getting the wrong idea about a person," she said, "that's like real stuff for these kids, that's what their life is like right now."

These days, the mother of three teaches in Minneapolis for COMPAS, a statewide nonprofit arts education organization. The Newbery award comes after her book was a New York Times bestseller; movie rights were sold in the fall to Fox Animation.

Barnhill said the most rewarding part of being a children's author is discussing the book with kids.

"It's particularly fun when I go someplace where the kids have already read the book. It's amazing how deep of thinkers they are," she said.

Minnesotan author Kate DiCamillo, who won the Newbery Medal winner for her book "The Tale of Despereaux," said she was delighted by Barnhill's win.

Asked what sets apart Barnhill's work, DiCamillo said: "It's that heart. And the imagination. And the courage to ask big questions."

Alec Baldwin to host SNL for record 17th time, smashing previous record

Actor Alec Baldwin is scheduled to host “Saturday Night Live” next month for the 17th time, in an appearance that will break comedian Steve Martin’s record for most times hosting the late-night comedy show.

>> Read more trending stories 

Baldwin's impression of President Donald Trump has garnered rave reviews and plenty of late-night laughs, as he played Trump throughout the 2016 presidential campaign and beyond.

The actor’s portrayal of Trump even provoked a response from the president himself via Twitter, with Trump calling "Saturday Night Live" "unwatchable." Baldwin responded by tweeting back, "Release yor tax returns and I'll stop. Ha."

Just tried watching Saturday Night Live - unwatchable! Totally biased, not funny and the Baldwin impersonation just can't get any worse. Sad— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 4, 2016

...@realDonaldTrump Release your tax returns and I'll stop.Ha— ABFoundation (@ABFalecbaldwin) December 4, 2016

Trump did appear on “Saturday Night Live” in Nov. of 2015, but that was before Baldwin began performing his hilarious spoof of him.

Baldwin will host the show on Feb. 11.

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