Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
97.1 The River
Last Song Played
Classic Hits

business

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

Gucci bans fur: Company CEO says it’s outdated, not modern

Luxury retailer Gucci will no longer create clothes, shoes and accessories with real 

animal fur, starting next year.

The ban includes the use of fur of minks, coyotes, raccoon dogs, foxes, rabbits and other animals, according to PETA.

>> Read more trending news 

Gucci president and chief executive Marco Bizzarri told Business of Fashion the use of fur is not “modern.”

“Do you think using furs today is still modern? I don’t think it’s still modern, and that’s the reason why we decided not to do that. It’s a little bit out-dated,” Bizzarri said Wednesday. “Creativity can jump in many different directions,

Images of the Northern California Wildfires

instead of using furs.”

According to The Telegraph, critics and organizations have been urging Gucci to ditch fur for years. 

“Gucci kept up the dialogue with us for eight years and, today, patience paid off,” said a  spokesman for the Humane Society of the United States. “With this announcement, Gucci has signaled to the entire luxury fashion industry that it’s time to move away from using fur.”

>> Related: Luxury retailer Coach introduces new name: Tapestry

Other popular brands have banned the use of real animal fur, including Giorgio Armani, Hugo Boss, Ralph Lauren, Stella McCartney, Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger, according to PETA.

“Being socially responsible is one of Gucci's core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals,” Bizzarri said Wednesday at an event in London. 

>> Related: No more 'Easy, Breezy, Beautiful': CoverGirl debuts new slogan

The move comes at a time when millennials care more about ethical standards regarding product creation.

“Today, the world is changing so fast, it’s not even an option not to change. We are not perfect, but we are doing our best to improve what we are doing,” Bizzarri said. “(And) I need to do it because (otherwise) the best talent will not come to work for Gucci.”

Bizzarri said Gucci products known for featuring fur, like its popular fur-lined loafers, will feature faux-fur, wool and “new fabric innovations,” Business of Fashion reported.

Gucci’s fur products bring in about $11.8 million a year, according to Business of Fashion.

The use of fur-free clothes will begin with Gucci’s Spring 2018 collection.

The fur industry is worth an estimated $40 billion a year, The Telegraph reported.

Luxury retailer Coach introduces new name: Tapestry

Luxury purse, accessories and clothing retailer Coach (Coach Inc.) no longer wishes to go by its long-familiar name. 

Coach, which purchased luxury shoe retailer Stuart Weitzman in 2015 and Kate Spade earlier this year, will re-image itself under the name Tapestry (Tapestry Inc.) in an effort to unify the three brands under one umbrella. 

>> Read more trending news 

According to The Associated Press, Coach purchased the Weitzman brand in a deal that cost as much as $574 million. It purchased Kate Spade in May for approximately $2.4 billion. 

“We are now at a defining moment in our corporate reinvention, having evolved from a mono-brand specialty retailer to a true house of emotional, desirable brands,” Coach CEO Victor Luis said Wednesday in a company release.

Many, including former Nordstrom executive Andrea Wasserman, reacted negatively to the name change on social media. 

Luis responded to the criticism, telling Reuters, “At the end of the day, some of the social media reaction is misplaced because people think we are changing the name of the Coach brand, which we are not doing. It’s really about creating a new corporate identity for Coach as a house of brands.”

The name change will go in effect Oct. 31, Reuters reported. The stock market ticker symbol for the company will change from “COH” to “TPR.”

Target testing Drive Up service at some stores

Target has begun testing a new service for its popular Target runs -- that is, quick trips to the store to pick up a few items.

According to an Oct. 2 news release, the retailer is testing out Drive Up, a service that allows customers to order something from Target and have it brought to their car by an employee.

>> Read more trending news

To access the feature, users place an order on the free Target app and select the Drive Up option. The app will alert customers when their order is ready for pick-up. When en route to pick up the item, users can tap the “I’m on My Way” button.

Similar to Chick-fil-A’s app, users will be able to park in a designated spot and wait for an employee to come out with their order.

“Stopping for diapers and toilet paper may not be glamorous, but it’s still on a lot of our to-do lists,” Dawn Block, Target senior vice president of digital said in the release. “Drive Up is our latest effort to make it easier and faster for busy guests to conveniently get what they need, and simply get back to their day.”

The curbside pick-up serice is still in its testing phase. CNBC reported that it’s only avialbe at 50 locations in the region around the retailer’s Minneapolis headquaters.

For now, the Target app is only on iOS devices.

Dove apologizes after Facebook ad called racially insensitive

Dove is apologizing following backlash over what many are calling a racially insensitive Facebook ad.

>> Read more trending news

Screenshots of the ad, used to market a soap product, show a black woman pulling a brown shirt over her head to reveal a white woman in a beige shirt underneath. A video capture of the ad shows a third woman.

>> See the photos and video here

The ad has been deleted, and the poor optics led to apologies on Facebook and Twitter. In both statements, the company acknowledged that it “missed the mark in thoughtfully representing women of color.”

>> See the apology here

Despite the apology, some couldn’t help but draw comparisons between portions of the ad and past racist depictions:

Others remembered some of Dove’s previous controversies:

AOL retiring its pioneering Instant Messenger app

Web company AOL announced the end of an era on Friday: Come December, the company’s groundbreaking Instant Messenger program will be retired.

>> Read more trending news

AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) was the first chat application of its kind when it launched in 1997.

“AIM tapped into new digital technologies and ignited a cultural shift, but the way in which we communicate with each other has profoundly changed,” said Michael Albers, vice president of communications products at Oath, AOL’s parent company. “As a result we’ve made the decision that we will be discontinuing AIM effective December 15, 2017.”

Users will no longer be able to sign into AIM starting Dec. 15, and all data associated with the app will be deleted thereafter, according to AOL. Users can save their images, files and chat history before then.

People who have email addresses under the aim.com domain name will still be able to access email as usual, according to AOL.

Company officials said in an FAQ about the change that no replacement app is in the works.

“Thank you to all of our AIM users,” Albers said. “We are more excited than ever to continue building the next generation of iconic brands and life-changing products for users around the world.”

Customer accuses Denny's waitress, manager of racism in viral Facebook post

A customer called out a waitress and manager at the Federal Way, Washington, Denny’s online Thursday after what he called a racist incident

The customer, Palmer L. Pellham, said he watched as a waitress and her manager targeted a group of young African-American men, asking them – and only them – to pay for their food in advance. 

Pellham narrated the incident in a Facebook post that he made public and which was then shared more than 32,000 times.

>> See the post here

Pellham said the group of young men had to wait about 10 minutes before they were seated, though the restaurant was empty. 

“The server comes out … and walks over to the young men’s table with their order slips,” Pellham writes. “She then asks for them to pay before the cook will prepare their food.” 

>> Read more trending news

Pellham said the waitress told the group she had several people order food and leave without paying, so her manager said she had to have them pay in advance

Pellham told the group of men to ask the manager why they were asked to pay in advance when Pellham and Pellham's wife, Esther, were not.

Denny’s officials wrote on the chain's Facebook page early Saturday morning, condemning the incident and saying the employees involved had been fired after a swift investigation. 

>> See the post here

Whole Foods: Customer payment info hacked at stores

Whole Foods Market said Thursday that customer payment information at some of the grocer’s in-store bars and restaurants was hacked.

>> Read more trending news

The company did not immediately say how many customers or stores might be affected, but said payment information was not hacked at its primary checkout counters because they use a different operating system.

“When Whole Foods Market learned of this, the company launched an investigation, obtained the help of a leading cyber security forensics firm, contacted law enforcement, and is taking appropriate measures to address the issue,” the company said in a written statement.

Whole Foods, which was recently purchased by online retailer Amazon, also said that Amazon’s system was not affected.

Most of Whole Foods’ more than 460 stores do not have in-store bars and restaurants. The ones that do are usually in or near larger cities. 

It’s unclear when the hack happened and when exactly Whole Foods learned of it. Whole Foods did not respond to a message left, seeking additional comment.

The company said it would continue to investigate the matter and provide updates when it has more information. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.  

Equifax to offer free credit freezes for life, new CEO says

Equifax’s new interim chief executive said the company is planning to offer a new life-long credit freeze service for free by the end of January.

>> Read more trending news

Paulino do Rego Barros Jr., who was named the company’s new CEO on Tuesday, announced that move Thursday, along with other efforts to improve its problem-plagued response to a massive data theft affecting 143 million Americans.

“On behalf of Equifax, I want to express my sincere and total apology to every consumer affected by our recent data breach,” Barros said in an op-ed that appeared in the Wall Street Journal. “People across the country and around the world, including our friends and family members, put their trust in our company. We didn’t live up to expectations.” 

According to a news report, Barros’ op-ed was not initially available on Equifax’s website on the security breach, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, but the site now has a link to it.

>> Related: Equifax apologizes for sending people to fake company website

In a move that could put pressure on the other two major credit bureaus, Experian and TransUnion, to offer similar life-long freezes, Barros said Equifax plans to offer a free service by Jan. 31 that will “let consumers easily lock and unlock access to their Equifax credit files. You will be able to do this at will.”

With the service, he said, “the cybercrime business will become a lot more difficult.”

Equifax’s efforts come as the Atlanta credit-tracking firm faces a storm surge of investigations, lawsuits and consumer complaints about its handling of the hacking scandal, one of the worst any company in the U.S. has faced.

Next week, former Equifax CEO Rick Smith is expected to be grilled before Senate and House committees looking into the breach.

>> Related: Report: Equifax hacked months earlier than previously admitted

Some lawmakers are calling for “clawbacks” of Equifax executives’ pay. Smith, who retired Tuesday, leaves the company with at least $48.9 million in stock awards and benefits accumulated during his 12-year tenure at the company.

Barros said the company is also extending the deadlines to the end of January for the free credit freezes and credit monitoring services it offered in the wake of the hacking incident. The company initially set up a one-month sign-up window after the data theft was disclosed on Sept. 7.

>> Related: Clark Howard: 10 things you need to know about the Equifax data breach

Afterwards, panicked consumers swamped Equifax's call center and website. Many said they weren't able to sign up, or Equifax's employees couldn't answer some questions. Thursday, Equifax's website indicated the problems continue.

“We are currently experiencing difficulties with our TrustedID website. As a result, the site may be unavailable periodically, and we are working hard to help reduce interruptions,” the company said on its website.

Barros said the company is working on fixing its website and adding more call center employees and additional training.

“We have to see this breach as a turning point — not just for Equifax, but for everyone interested in protecting personal data,” he said.

 

Netflix, iTunes email scams targeting bank account info, reports say

A new email scam is targeting Netflix and iTunes users in order to obtain access to their bank account info, according to multiple reports.

The Guardian reported that, according to a reader letter to its consumer division, an email that appears to be from Netflix warns users that their Netflix accounts are on hold.

>> Read more trending news

“A link in the email takes users to a fake Netflix page, where you are invited to input your bank details. It is realistic and will no doubt catch out a few people whose bank card has just expired,” a user said in a Tuesday letter to the publication.

WGN also reported about the phishing scam stateside, saying that customers are told that their payment details need to be updated because of a billing error, the Monday report said.

The email may ask for updated bank information to be emailed, and in other cases, it may link to a fake website requesting bank information.

similar scam was reported in January.

Similarly, WFLA reported that the iTunes scam claims someone is making unauthorized purchases from the user’s account and requests login information to correct it. That way, the user’s Apple ID and password are stored on the scammer’s database.

Like any phishing scam, consumers are warned not to click on any links in the email.

According to the Netflix help center website, the company will never ask for personal information to be sent over email, including credit and debit card numbers and passwords.

“Netflix may email you to update this information with a link to our website, but be cautious of fake emails that may link to phishing websites. If you’re unsure about a link in an email, you can always hover your cursor over the link to see where it directs in which you can see the real linked web address at the bottom of most browsers,” the website reads.

Suspicious emails can be reported to Netflix by forwarding them to phishing@netflix.com and deleting the email. The message and header information should be included in the forwarded email. More information on reporting suspicious emails to the company are at the Netflix website.

Apple says users who suspect a phishing attempt can forward the suspeicous email, including header information, to reportphishing@apple.com. 

“If you believe that your Apple account (Apple ID) has been compromised, by phishing or otherwise, please sign in to the Apple ID page to change your password immediately,” the Apple support site reads.

More information is at the Apple Support site.

Equifax CEO is out after massive data breach

Equifax CEO Richard Smith is out after the credit bureau reported a massive data breach earlier this month.

>> Read more trending news

The move, described as a retirement, was made effective immediately on Tuesday. Paulino do Rego Barros Jr., the head of Equifax’s Asian operations, has been named interim CEO, and board member Mark Feidler has been named non-executive chairman.

Officials with the Atlanta-based credit reporting and technology company said a “cyber security incident” might have exposed the personal information of 143 million Americans.

Hackers exploited a software glitch to gain access to the trove of personal data, the company said. Equifax disclosed earlier this month that the data breach was discovered in July and believed to have taken place from mid-May to July.

>> Related: Equifax, software maker blame each other for opening door to hackers

The data believed to have been accessed included names, Social Security numbers, birth dates and addresses.

In a statement, Feidler said, “The Board remains deeply concerned about and totally focused on the cybersecurity incident.”

“We are working intensely to support consumers and make the necessary changes to minimize the risk that something like this happens again,” he said. “We have formed a Special Committee of the Board to focus on the issues arising from the incident and to ensure that all appropriate actions are taken.”

Smith had been Equifax's CEO since 2005.

In a statement, Smith called his tenure at Equifax “an honor, and I’m indebted to the 10,000 Equifax employees who have dedicated their lives to making this a better company.”

Although many analysts had applauded Equifax's performance under Smith, he and the rest of his management team had come under fire for lax security and its response to the breach.

Smith is expected to testify before Congress in early October.

>> Related: Equifax apologizes for sending people to fake company website 

WSBTV obtained video of the Smith speaking to students and faculty at the University of Georgia last month, after the company’s massive data breach occurred but before the company disclosed it.

The company didn’t disclose the breach until Sept. 7.

The Associated Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >